1915 Historical masonry house with about 5000 SF with a big boiler and 28 radiators

Mrs,G and Johnnyapple.,

Since you guys are talking about wood and coal stove to heat for a big house, I bought a historical home in November of 2014 that my 21 yrs old son live in one of the 5 bed rooms and be a care taker and rent out the other 4 bed rooms to Pre-med students. The boiler and radiators were pretty old and needed to be replaced. I was shocked to here that the new boiler and 28 radiators will cost me $50,000 but it got to be done. I looked at other options but the boiler was the most efficient way to heat this big old house. I was wonder if the original owner ever thought of putting a coal burning stove first before he decided to put in the giant boiler?

Tony

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Tony, I live in a Queen Anne Victorian Farmhouse. It is loaded with radiators too! We have a huge oil tank in the basement and a well (for back up) should we ever need it. My house was built in 1893 and the radiator (s) in every room still work. The only thing that is high is oil bill! I think we should move this conversation to the lounge, but I don’t know how![quote=“mrsg47, post:2, topic:4212, full:true”]
Tony, I live in a Queen Anne Victorian Farmhouse. It is loaded with radiators too! We have a huge oil tank in the basement and a welL (with water) for back up should we ever need it. My house was built in 1893 and the radiator (s) in every room still work. The only thing that is high is oil bill! I think we should move this conversation to the lounge, but I don’t know how!
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MrsG.

Mine is filled with water and not oil. The boiler is heated by natural gas and the big motor pump the hot water to the radiators. My son will leaving for Med school in a year and I am sure If I will keep the house or sell it. I will be sorry if the students turn the house into a Frat house.

Tony

Tony the style reminds me of a hotel I stayed at last time I passed through Iowa http://thecontinental.info/. The pictures don’t do the old hotel justice. I wonder if it was originally a similar design with the boiler .

Tony, What a gorgeous house!! I think I’ve seen that house on my different trips to Omaha. Around Dodge and UN?

You may want to get other quotes. We’re in the process of renovating a 5K+ sq ft house and are putting in an all new heating and cooling system for $30K, plus a bit for electrical. We went to three different HVAC places (all recommended to us and one we’d previously used) and got 30, 48, and $68K quotes, so there is a huge amount of variability. For ours, they are replacing the oil fired boiler, installing 3 air handlers, 3 AC units, and removing radiators and installing ductwork for 2/3 of the house (last third already had ducts).

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I think hers is also filled with water, the oil is burnt to heat the water.

That would be my fear as well. That’s a pretty house for housing college kids.

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Bob, thanks for the tips. Wish you luck on the renovation.

Tony

Thanks Tony. I should clarify the system (Hydro Air), in case you (or anyone else, I suppose) is interested. The oil-fired boiler heats water and sends it around the house, to each of the three zones (easier to move it long distances than hot air). Once it gets to a zone, it goes into the air-handler through a heat exchanger, where it heats the air, which is then pushed through the duct work. The same air handler can use chilled coolant from the AC during the summer. While radiators are just as efficient, or more so for heating they don’t give you an easy path to central air which is an almost required feature in high-end houses.

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@tonyOmahaz5,
What a beautiful House! I love all the wood working. I like the way they can use space in the older houses. My friends house has all the cast iron radiators in it. He has a toilet in his bathroom that’s under the stairs. He has second set of stairs built small scale for kids too. I helped remodeled almost every part of that house for free. We added a two story addition (master bed) over his new kitchen. Changed every roof on it that was flat with trusses, and rebuilt the front porch. His house Was made with rough sawed cedar sitting on stone. They used newspaper for insulation! One of the papers said (Ford Buy’s Lincoln!).

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On February 4, 1922, Ford Motor Company bought Lincoln Motor Company for $8 million.