Asian, American & Hybrid Persimmons are in good shape

The hail storm spared the persimmons. I am looking forward to a decent harvest this Fall.

Tony

Ichi Non-astringent Asian persimmon.

Nikita’s Gift Hybrid persimmon.

Prok American persimmon.

Multi-grafted of 9 varieties American persimmon.

6 Likes

Tony,

Your collection of persimmons is very, very impressive in my book! Nothing beats the hard-earned fruits of your labor…

Tom

1 Like

Tom,

Thanks,. Deer love to eat the persimmon leaves and fruits so I installed a deer fence. Do you have any persimmon tree?

Tony

No, not yet. I’m still pondering due to space availability. I was planning to install a persimmon where I had the multi-grafted cherry tree installed 4-5 years ago. That cherry tree was bursting with growths for the first few years than started languishing for 2 years with no fruit, no real growth anymore. This year, when I expected it to die out (cranker and all) and readied to dig it up, it flowered and set fruits! So, everything needs to be on hold until further observation! :expressionless:

Tom

Tony,

Those are indeed impressive. I only hope that my Nikita’s Gift will live long enough to produce fruit. I grafted Tam Kam and Saijo on it. Too soon to know if they will take.

I’ve found persimmon’s flowers rather odd, a nice kind of oddness, though.

1 Like

Tom,

If you run out of space and have to choose one for that particular site, I vote for A. persimmon. Cherry is a pain. Persimmon, if all the experts are correct, is care-free. I vote for American because the tree is a lot more cold hardy. Maybe, you can graft other hybrids on it later.

If you are willing to wrap your trees like Tony does, you can grow A. persimmon even the non-astringent ones. I wish Tony lived near me. I could invite him to demonstrate how to winter-protect my persimmon tree every year :grin:

1 Like

Mamuang,

I’m getting older by the day so I do not wish to go through the TWP efforts (Tony’s Wintering Persimmon) but can only admire from afar. The American persimmons are hardy but yields tiny and astringent fruits for the effort and real estate. I’m still not quite sure that I’m gamed for that. Grafting something else that’s hardy and produces larger fruits (even astringent) is probably the alternative for me.

But I still have to see my cherry tree either flourish or die out before knowing what to do next year! Besides, I’m tempting to give paw paw the space that the cherry is currently occupied! Or maybe the persimmon?

Tom

Tony, they look great! Your work has inspired me to start my own persimmon patch, thank you for sharing your experiences and knowledge.

1 Like

Tom,
TWP : it should stand for Tony’s Winter Protection, shouldn’t it?

I did the stuff leaves and burlap wrap for my NG. I don’t want to get technical with electricity. It could put my life at risk unnecessarily instead of protecting the tree as it was intended :grin:

Tell me about it!

1 Like

Hi, Tony,
Thanks for the pictures, I wanted to ask you several questions:

Do you know the following varieties of Korean astringent persimmons and you can give me information from them ?,

Te-bong
Bu-ju
Con-Pjong

What technique graft from your experience is most suitable for grafting persimmons and when you usually do?

Thank you

Pajar,

Cliff England at nuttrees.net may knows some of those Korean persimmon varieties. You can email him.
The only two Korean persimmons that I bark grafted were Kyung San Ban Si astringent and Tam Kam non-astringent in my collection. I normally used 10% Cleft grafts for smaller scions and 90% Bark grafts on larger understocks. I Liked Bark graft better because of high percentage of take but you have to brace your grafts from wind or bird damage due to the weak union but after 3 to 4 months they will be strong again just like Cleft graft. You can watch Dr Yao on how to bark graft jujube on Youtube and It is pretty simple bark graft tutorial. I graft my persimmon scions in middle of May in Zone 5. I waited until their leaves growth to about 3 inches long and the bark slip and the weather is in the upper 70s or around 80 degrees. The most important part is aftercare, you have to rub off all the new growths below the union every few days or else your grafts will die because the new growths will take all the saps away from your newly grafted scion.

Tony

Thanks Tony for your kindness, I will ask Cliff to see if he can give me more information about these Korean varieties.

I use small patterns, and use the Cleft grafts, if I do not succeed with the graft under I use Bud grafts with refrigerated scionwood.

John