Bears in your neck of the woods?


#21

In a situation like that, 100% culling is probably the only reasonable way to go. Bring the carcasses to Salem Prime Cuts or some other specialty butcher in the state and have the taxpayers pay for processing. Then donate to the soup kitchens. What do they expect the bears to do in their new environment? Trap and release, so they become another person’s problem…


#22

IF the bears would eat the deer …


#23

Now you’re talking…!!


#24

All we need is slower deer.


#25

they will kill the fawns in the spring.


#26

The bears around us have learned human ways, One down the road was observed working a door handle on a house! (Fortunately the door was locked) They are intelligent creatures with a big appetite, but they have usually have a good sense of when they are “tresspassing” on human territory. Not that they won’t do it, but they are watchful and get out quickly if discovered…


#27

Yes. Ours will pretty much always run unless Cubs are involved. I’ve walked within 50 feet of adults at night and they ran like hell .


#28

Earlier today I read a year old Hartford Courant article about bear hunting that noted that the bears here are not afraid of people, but that in bear hunting areas the bears learn to be cautious of people. Your anecdote confirms this.


#29

Just need more mountain lions like spokane peach! They will keep the bunny and deer population in check and dont eat fruit! They also are very shy of humans which is nice


#30

Report is a bear made its way down main street in the nearyby town, opening car doors and getting into anything left out that it considered edible.

I’ve always said, I lock my car and house doors from bears not people.


#31

dumpster divers!


#32

I got up at 12:30am to yell at the dog for barking (not unusual for her, she doesn’t like when the raccoons raid the bird feeders). I got a surprise when I flipped on the outside light to a bear on the back deck. Going to have to take the feeders down for a while I guess (although it was the trash can full of seed they were raiding).


#33

So you know this bear @Steve333? This happened in CO. That’s one determined bear!


#34

LOL. Don’t know him personally, but not that surprised.

Speaking of wildlife, Bullwinkle here was munching away outside the house where we went for dinner tonight

Judging from the length of his beard (forget the name for that) he’s probably 8-9 years old, or so I am told by the more knowledgeable people there. He was about 80’ from the house when I snapped this pic, seemed fairly mellow for an older male but I was glad I was on a raised deck.


#35

Nice looking bull.


#36

Here in Australia we only get drop bears…


#37

Reminds me of videos I’ve seen of baboons in urban parts of Africa. At least we don’t have wild baboons in the US (yet).

There’s a fairly large state park not far from me in North Carolina where the deer will just about eat out of your hand. What amazes me about it is that the park is surrounded by rural land with lots of hunters. I know deer sometimes roam for miles, but the deer in that park have apparently figured out where the park boundaries are and always stay within them (unless they’ve figured out when hunting season is, too, and just stay within the boundaries during hunting season.) I wouldn’t have thought hunting could make such a difference in large animal behavior across such small differences.