Can someone identify this mushroom?


#41

Yup it’s hollow


#42

When I find a spot like that I crawl all around there and make sure I get them all. One of my tricks is to flip over leaves, bark etc. because there are more underneath. Check that spot again because there will be another bunch of morels pop up again.


#43

If you get in morel country and find a burned out stump you might linger there a while!


#44

Those are yellow morels, but they are well past prime and you wouldn’t be able to sell them. Like any fruit, mushrooms have a very narrow window in which they are prime. These are well past that, unfortunately. It only takes a day or three for them to go from prime to inedible.


#45

They are drying out a bit but still edible. I would eat them. They dry out a bit when they are exposed to air. Here is an old photo I took of one drying out and one not dried out. 7DFA1073-5E52-4776-9594-4AA74ACCD04B


#46


#47

I thought we’d see some prepared meals.


#48

In most states you need a certification to sell wild mushrooms… I read an article in the paper last year about people who are hunting through urban areas and selling the mushrooms which is kind of scary because they are probably mostly amateurs and mushrooms are bioaccumulators of heavy metals so it is not recommended to harvest them from roadsides and other potentially contaminated areas.


#49

Yes…just give me all those found near the roads that might be contaminated…lol!


#50

These just showed up in my yard on mulched area today and I am not sure about these can somebody


#51

My guess is Wine cap but I am not sure.


#52

The ones with reddish caps and bluish gills look like Stropharia rugosoannulata. You can make spore prints by putting the caps on paper and covering with cups or bowls so they don’t dry out, it is an important part of identification. On some types chemical tests might even be required.

The one with white gills is something else. You can try using a key to narrow it down, notice that specifics such as ecology are listed, mushrooms get their food from different sources. Some attack live plants, some decompose, and others have a mutually beneficial relationships with tree roots. It is also important to collect the entire mushroom, even underground parts, some deadly poisonous species have a characteristic bulge at their base that is easily broken off and ignored. Mushrooms that grow on wood can look like they are growing out of the soil from tree roots if the wood has been buried.

I’d buy the Audubon field guide to mushrooms to get familiar with the terminology and have something with you in the field when you find them. There are also local clubs that go on walks with experts there to identify everything.


#53

Thank you very much for the useful information and I will do the same as you suggested.


#54

the gray gilled ones look like wine caps. I’ve seen the white gilled ones around here. can’t remember the name off my head but they will get you sick. proper i.d is crucial! spore print is one way but you need multiple ways to i.d to be sure . i raise wine caps in my chip mulch. they come up for many years all over the yard once established. just need to keep adding wood mulch. i use coarse sawdust from a firewood business.


#55

Side note but related topic: found several patches of wild leeks this year…if the rains bring morels in the next week that would be a nice pairing. As it is i took some leaves and sauteed w green beans. Yum


#56

Found this mushroom growing in my orchid pot. Its colour mixes well with white rock in the pot.does anyone know what kind mushroom is this?


#57

I’ve got a couple of clusters of this showing up in my squarefoot gardens. It looks like wood ear but isn’t growing on the wood edges, but in the soil.


#58

Maybe cup fungi?

Or a buried piece of wood?


#59

I’ve got lots of these cup fungi coming up all around and on the edges of my wine cap mushroom bed…

Please tell me this doesn’t mean I did all that work on the larger of two beds I made to raise wine caps. Any chance the wine caps and cup fungi can co-exist?

Scott


#60

wine cap mycelium is much more aggressive than most other fungi. wine caps will out compete them. only other mushroom probably more aggressive is oysters.