Clark's Small Yellow Pear Graft

Clark was so kind to offer his leftover scions. Here’s what was a Red Bartlett I picked up at Wal-mart and yesterday I removed the last nurse branches of the Bartlett. I now have a 5-6’ “Small Yellow Pear.” I also have a great supply of bench grafts :slight_smile: Thanks Clark, you’re a good man.

Dax
P.s. Harrow Sweet is the only pollenizer Clark knows for it.

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Dax,
Glad to see those worked out good for you. Remember the first year or two the pears will taste like green walnut husk but then everything changes. I nearly top worked the pear and likely would have if I would not have been so busy that year.

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Glad you reminded me.

Dax

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Clark, when are you going to give that pear a proper name? “Clarks Golden”?

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@ Speedster,
I’m hopeful I’m getting close to finding it’s parentage. I’ve grafted any pear I can find with a description close to it. Once I find it’s parents or siblings than I’m going to go back and look at the breeding program. There is a good possibility it’s a remnant of an old group of pears like Ernie, Meanie, Miney, Moe. There were several other pears originally grown as part of that group. To many things about this pear don’t seem to be an accident but rather a skilled pear breeders life work. It blooms exceedingly late missing 90% of all frosts. It’s sweet and delicious and leaves me wanting more. It’s leaves are perfect having had only one fireblight strike in many years of growing. The pear shows resistant not just to scab and fireblight but also rust. Sure sounds like the Canadians breeding work to me so now the question is if it’s not the harrow group of pears then it must be the previous one. It’s bloom times overlap harrow sweet so it could be an accident or whoever developed the harrow sweet, delight etc. may have been familiar with this pear. I think the original breeders were genius about pear devopment. If they made this pear I want them to get their credit. See what information I’ve reconstructed so far from this original pear breeding program from Canada that it could possibly belong to Canadian Pears Enie, Menie, Miney, Moe, Phileson

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@clarkinks, could it be Klementinka pear? When I’ve read description, I was thinking that it sounds like your small yellow pear.

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Unfortunately the small yellow pear is not crunchy like Klementinka. That was an extremely good guess!

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Antmary ,
I think you already are aware Klementinka is one of the high quality pears on the curators choice https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/20721500/Postman/Curator's%20Choice%20Pears%2002-2012.pdf. The trees are available here Pear, 'Klementinka' – Cricket Hill Garden. The small yellow pear I grow Has many similarities to it but they are also very different pears for many other reasons eg. Red blush, more elongated fruit etc… Certainly it looks like a great pear to grow.

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My small yellow pear generally comes through even on a bad pear year because it’s bloom time is very late. They are starting to size up.


These may not look like much yet but I used @fruitnut tutorial last July and tbudded a couple more which are growing quickly.

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Always enjoyed pears but too many times from the supermarket I got hard pears that didn’t jive for me. I’m looking for juice running down my arm and all over my shirt.

My mouth is salivating, Clark.

Thanks for the photos! By the way I saw those chip buds you did and the growth that ensued. We’ll get you doing bark grafts and you’ll never mess with a splice again. I wish I was near enough to you so I could show you how to do them.

Dax

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I do bark grafts aka rind grafts when trees have very large diameter trunks. The bark grafts take a bit to heal in my experience and I’ve only done them
With dormant wood. The thing I love about tbuds is I can use them in July when I could not normally graft.

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You do them well too. Real clean looking.

Dax

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Dax,
Thank you! Mentioned in other posts but not here the small yellow pear will set two crops sometimes. You can see both crops in these photos I took today.

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Edit: meant to reply specifically to Clark.

Dax

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Sweeeet.

I thought I’d have some fun today and T-bud a flat of oaks. Well, they wouldn’t have anything to do with me. That flat has tattered and crispy leaves so I didn’t water enough to have fully slipping bark. There be the culprit.

Going to plant the pear tomorrow; a few other grafts that have gotten good size from 2015. And, I believe the Japanese beetles are nearly gone for this year.

Thanks for the info.!

Dax

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Finish the thread on my part with a planted “Small Yellow Pear”

Dax

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The small yellow pear is ripening today (August 11th) so I thought someone might appreciate a few pictures. Remember when they are totally ripe they fall from the tree and your to late. The good news is one or two ripen earlier than others. You can’t depend on the tilt test with this pear. I’ve checked them daily over a week now. The tilt test works but your window is less than half a day so when the first one ripens and you tilt it and it breaks off or the wind does it for you immediately harvest all the others. The pears will not keep long and will have a yellowish green color when ripe. The finest pear I’ve ever had! They make clapps favorite pear look like a bad pear and it’s considered excellent!

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You lucky dog you. Eating those right now.

Thank you for the info. A lot of people on here don’t realize that I am not fluent in practices or especially abbreviations. Gosh, insects & disease and cultivar abbreviations are work. Don’t pamper me though, I’ll eventually become fluent.

And back to the point, thank you.

Dax

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I’m careful about how I pick them but got a 5 gallon bucket off the tree. They bruise easy so they are slow picking and hard to keep! If they turn yellow on the tree they will be rotten inside. Tommorow time permitting I’ll finish picking them.

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How did you get permission to plant fruit trees on that golf course :wink:

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