Hardwood Cuttings, Rooting Suggestions?


#1

I am moving in a month, and I cannot get my plants out of the frozen ground to take with me (unless you all have any ideas on how to do that!). Today it occurred to me that I might be able to take some hardwood cuttings and try to root them. I’m mainly concerned with my dwarf cherries and my haskap collection, but I also have some currants and hardy kiwis I wouldn’t mind taking. I’ve read the threads regarding haskap rootings (great detailed info, thanks!), which also included some cherries, so I think I have the basic idea of what I am doing (rooting hormone, slow release fertilizer (cherries only?), sterilized coir, lights). I have a couple questions, is bottom heat necessary for all of those fruits, and if so, what should the ambient temperature be for the top portion of the plants? Is a standard LED grow light sufficient? The other issue is my plants are relatively immature, most are 2-3yr old plants that haven’t fruited, or barely fruited. Will they still take OK? I’ve rooted simple things in water before, but this will be a new adventure for me. Thanks!


#2

If you want to keep it simple, my preferred method for propagating a large quantity of material, take as many cuttings of current years growth and keep them in the refrigerator until the soil at your new location has warmed to around 60 degrees. Till the soil good, dip them in root hormone if you want then stick them in the ground, lightly water and cover with a clear plastic. I usually bury the ends in the dirt so the wind doesn’t dry out the cuttings. Leave all but one bud above the ground, the stick will hold more moisture the more of it is in the ground.

If you want to do it indoors, then 50 - 60 degrees on top and 75 - 80 degrees on bottom and you don’t need a light on until bud break begins, which should come after callus then root growth.

Hardwood cuttings let you take as much of the current years growth as you want versus softwood cuttings which are only the tip. So immature plants, as long as they have lots of good growth, will root just fine, assuming that species is easily rooted. I think @TheDerek has rooted cherries indoors.


#3

Thanks for the suggestions @ILParadiseFarm!


#4

Blackcurrants are easily propagated from hardwood cuttings.
For haskaps - better cut all the branches about 2" above the ground and dig the plants up. Keep in cool place and don’t let the roots to dry out. They will recover for only one year at their new place.


#5

If I could dig the haskap up I would, but our ground is so frozen I’m not sure how to dig them out. The cuttings were a last ditch effort at saving some of what I had going. I am going to try my hardest to get the important ones dug out, but I don’t see the ground thawing much in the next 30 days :frowning:. I did put my newest three haskap in pots last summer (Beauty, Beast and Blizzard) so I know I can get those to move with me - so if all else fails - I’ve got three good ones!


#6

@Amy
Frozen ground;
Maybe try very slowly pouring hot water around the crown of the plant . Maybe 5gal or so , this may thaw enough around base of the plant to allow you to at least get the crown out .? Worth a shot ?
Or it may freeze into a harder block of ice ?


#7

Have you tried a pickaxe? I think you can do it.


#8

@Hillbillyhort and @Bede - two ways I hadn’t thought of, I’ll give them a try - thanks!!!