Haskap aka Honeyberries 2020 will they grow everywhere

There is little i know about Haskaps though i do know my original attempts ended in failure many years ago. The sun was to hot for them here in Kansas. Anyone have recommendations on variety, where to buy them etc.? Here is what i think there is to choose from according to hartmanns commercial nursery
“This new fruit has the potential of becoming the fruit of the future! Haskap berries popularly known as Honey Berries are tasty and nutritious. The flesh of the deep blue fruits ripen with a red to purple colored pigment an indication of high nutrient fruit. Fruit size and shapes will vary depending upon the variety, but for the most part the shapes are oblong and 1.0 to 1.5 grams per berry. The flavors are honey sweet, juicy, with a hint of tartness and aromatic blends of black currants, blueberries, and black raspberries. The plant is best described as a multi-stemmed shrub, much like a highbush blueberry bush and are easy to grow. It is recommended to plants using the same methods as blueberry plants, but the plant requires a pH above 5.0 and will grow in most soil types and climates. The following 5 cultivars have a USDA hardiness of zones 7-3.”
University of Saskatchewan

AURORA – BU-W-7300 The fruits are large and powdery blue with an elongated, slightly tapered shape. The stem scar is dry with high quality fruits and excellent choice for fresh or IQF frozen. The berries are longer than wide with an average berry weight 1.9 grams. The flavor of fruits is regarded as sweet when ripe. The plants grow upright to 6 feet with a 3 feet width.

CINDERELLA - This cultivar is extremely vigorous, growing to a mature height of 4 feet and spreading 3 feet. The medium size fruits have good quality, and are best eaten fresh from the bush to enjoy the excellent fresh blend of flavors. This is a good choice for home gardens and u-pick growers.

Origin: University of Saskatchewan

Tundra- lives up to its name, as the plants have extreme tolerance to cold climate conditions. The plants grow vigorously and will grow to a mature height of 6.5 feet within a few years. Tundra is considered to be the best cultivar for the commercial grower. The fruits have the excellent firmness with a small dry stem scar, and can be harvested mechanically with a blueberry harvester.

The fruits are large compared to other cultivars with the average fruit weighing 1.5 grams, similar to a medium size blueberry. The firm fruits will melt as they are eaten and are highly aromatic, black raspberry sweetness with a blueberry tang. The fruits shape, light blue color, and size are very attractive for fresh markets and well suited for Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) for the process markets.

Origin: University of Saskatchewan*

Indigo Gem- yields fruits that are excellent in quality. This cultivar would be the choice for mechanical harvest for the fresh or process markets. The fruits of most Haskap cultivars are soft and melt in your mouth when eaten whereas the Indigo Gem has thicker skin and flesh therefore the fruit is chewier much like a grape. This is a good attribute for the process market because when the berries are cooked they will remain a similar shape.

The plants will produce consistent average yields, in one test area the variety produced twice the amount of fruit compared to other cultivars. Plants are vigorous and will grow 5.5 feet at maturity. The shape of the fruits are shorter and oval with an average weight of 1.3 grams. The fruits have good firmness with nice blend of sweet and mild tanginess. Indigo Gem will be a very suitable fruit for shipping long distance for the fresh market and a good choice for the frozen markets.

Origin: Russia

Czech 17-, also known as Berry Blue is super vigorous. The plants will grow to a mature height of 5 to 6 feet and 3.5 feet wide. The medium fruits are firm and will yield 10 to 15 pounds. The flavor of the fruits is good, but this variety is best for making deserts and juicing. An abundant amount of flowers are grown and appear over a long period of time, making Czech an excellent pollinator for all Haskap cultivars. Fruiting occurs for more than 6 weeks beginning in the early part of summer.

Origin: University of Saskatchewan*

**Indigo Treat - ** fruits are high in flavor. The flavor of black currants is more pronounced, with a strong aromatic sweetness of black raspberries and blueberries. The light blue fruits are longer and flatter than other cultivars, and are attractive for the fresh markets.

This is one cultivar that will definitely melt in your mouth. The fruits have excellent firmness with a stem scar that is small and dry, a good attribute for mechanical harvesting and the fresh markets. The plants have medium to high vigor growing to 5.5 feet tall, with average to high yields.

As the name implies honeyberryusa has them available but seem more focused on retail sales Honeyberry, Haskap, and other Cold Hardy Fruit Trees
As your aware University of Saskatchewan (usask) is behind most of the varities Links - University of Saskatchewan Fruit Program - University of Saskatchewan

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I bought Blue Velvet and Blue Moon in 2012 and planted them for a customer of mine. Both have done well in a front yard with full sun from about 11 to 5 p.m. I got to ‘sample’ them. Since then, I’ve bought a couple from Burnt Ridge Nursery, but don’t recall the variety off-hand. They have not fruited for me yet.

I suspect the best bet would be the ones from the University of Saskatchewan: Aurora, Beehive, and the Boreal Blizzard/Beast/etc.

Partial afternoon shade would be ideal in zone 6…and they may defoliate in late summer heat/drought, but will recover.

I’ve not looked at nor researched the Haskap/Honeyberries in a couple years, so there may be lots of new ones I am unaware of. I do recommend trying them…but I wouldn’t want to do a commercial planting in Kentucky unless I was prepared to use shade cloth, at least not until more trials have proven they do well here. But they are a honeysuckle bush…and we know how tough some species of honeysuckle can be! (Much less finicky than blueberries.)

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I think warmer zones twnd to do better with varieties based on japanese genetica. They may also require irrigation in dry climates or seasons.

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Aurora is the best one, then the Boreal series. Reading those descriptions, not that accurate, hyped for sure. Most have a certain amount of tartness. Some are even astringent, but not all.
As far as growing in Kansas, well you may have to go with certain ones in shade. The Japanese cultivars flower later.

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i agree. the japanse cultivars seem to tolerate heat better from what i read. HoneyberryUSA carries them as well as a few others.

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I have a few – Maxie and Solo. I got them locally from a grower who said they would do fine in zone 6b/7a. They remind me of blueberries, though less juicy and more tart, and lower yield. They have been healthy and trouble free.

I find them an invaluable and exciting nibble on those early weeks of summer when the blueberries aren’t ripe yet and I’m craving the first fresh berries of the year. It’s also fun to share them with people who have never heard of them.

But I don’t plan on planting more than what I need for those early nibbles. Once blueberry season hits my interest wanes aside from the novelty.

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What’s great about honeyberries is how nutritious they are. Much much more than blueberries. Also some have a very good flavor like Aurora. Production once mature will rival any blueberry. Boreal Blizzard has these huge berries too. I love blueberries too but honeyberries have earned a permanent spot in my garden too.

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@Drew51
That is very encouraging since we do not have acidic soil here.

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I grow a couple in containers. Aurura is in a container. 3rd or 4th leaf, still just a small bush. Yields are decent. This is off Aurora in a 10 gallon pot in 2019. Harvested 6-27-19

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l love them just sprinkled with a little sugar and some yogurt or milk. the milk turns a lovely purple/ blue. i actually like the tartness of them. they are a very interesting flavored fruit. would love to make wine with them. bet b. currant / honey berry mix would be very interesting.

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I think you may be able to order wine via mail? I’m tempted to get an early try on it.

Probably would somewhat resemble a Pinot Noir wine.

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I planted a small commercial test run of 80 Aurura and 80 Tundra at my zone 6a farm last year. We use permaculture practices so some of them were planted as an under story for other fruit trees (apples, pears, and peaches), others planted as a path barrier in an area that gets shade, and some planted along a mature tree line. I have great hope for these berries and I am very excited to be growing them. The Love Honeyberries site has a pretty good book available for growers and also sells a lot of cultivars. I am seriously considering planting another smaller plot of one of their trial packs, the sweet cultivars, to be exact.

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@FarmGirl-Z6A
You must be located in Canada. The lovehoneyberry website i think is only available to Canada and Europe.

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No, I am stateside. I contacted Logie, of Lovehoneyberry and he was able to give me a rough estimate of the cost to ship to me. It wasn’t a cheap estimate, but I think it’s still less expensive than buying the varieties in the quantities offered in the package from growers stateside.

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Oh cool. That makes sense; my blueberries have a several year head start.

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How far do you plant honeyberries from fruit trees when you plant them as understory? I’ve been thinking of planting under my young pears and apples, but I’m not quite sure how to go about it.

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Good question! And I don’t know as I’m learning too. But I expect, like with pawpaws and some other fruits, that crops of fruits would be heavier in the sun. Otherwise, honeyberries will probably grow fine under fruit trees or as forest understory. Blueberries do, but don’t fruit well.

A question I have is if HASKAP / Honeyberries will tolerate juglone from the roots of a black walnut tree?

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i think in warmer zones, where the sun is stronger, they would do well in some shade. up closer to its northern zone limit, full sun is preferable.

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I haven’t tried since my last failure (Blue Sky, Blue Sea), but for my high heat, I was recommended on another forum to trial Indigo Treat, Boreal Blizzard and Yezberry (Solo & Maxie).

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the new cultivars don’t have mildew problems or suffer leaf burn like the older cultivars do.

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