July 4th Teaching Graft Actually Took

Around July 4 here in zone 7B Maryland I was showing a curious ten year old boy how to graft an apple tree. I cut a scion off a Benham apple branch, stripped the leaves, and immediately grafted it back on another Benham branch tip with whip and tongue (rubber band plus parafilm over entire graft and scion). Did this just for demonstration purposes. Two weeks later I happen to notice- the graft took!!

Makes me think in an emergency this could work again to save a special variety. Anyone else tried mid-summer whip and tongue grafting with a non-dormant scion?

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I think this method has been overlooked by many grafters for the more conventional t-bud or chip-bud during this time of the year. During the last six weeks I added about 20 with mostly cleft grafts. Most all have taken and have done well as of now. I think this method will open up another good grafting method.

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I did a Damson that broke of in an unfortunate accident around July 1st. It was the only one I had so I cleft grafted a scion, (minus leaves) and it seems to be still green and pushing new buds.

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I might try this leafed out scion, mid-summer W/T tomorrow on an Asian persimmon since my batting average for persimmon could not get worse. There’s nothing below zero unless you believe my Algebra teacher.

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Yes Sir done it many times always with Pear I think. Always stripped the leaves and covered with parafilm. Ive done whip tongue and cleft and mostly had takes suprisingly.

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This is all very interesting to hear about! Maybe there are no rules, but that’s a deep philosophical question.

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I wonder as well. Many fruit grafters on this forum have done interesting things that are not supposed to work but do. These are usually done, as in the case of my Damson, out of desperation and go against everything I have read so far. Guess I should stop reading and just do.:confused:

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This is just a little information based on doing this last year (2015). The later in the season you wait the less dependable this type graft appears to be. It seems to work best on actively growing wood and by wrapping it in parafilm.

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Would the later grafts be less winter hardy, I wonder?

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That is a risk if they don’t harden off in time. I’ve done budding on apples and cherries in August: some survive and grow; some get zapped by cold the following winter.

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In my area we have a long growing season but this is about as long as I would want to wait to force buds. If you graft now it will take about 3 weeks for the new growth to get started. This is a time that I would think appropriate for t-buds or chip-buds and wait until spring to force them to grow.

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I did not know that what you have done was possible. Very cool!

that’s encouraging…A couple of weeks ago, I tried a whip and tongue graft from an Anna to a Dorsett, but it doesn’t look like it’s going to take. Only my 3rd attempt at grafting. guessing I need more practice.