Muscadines 2024

I think I came across a wild muscadine today.

Also, do y’all think you could grow a muscadine along the fence in the one picture?


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Train the muscadine vine along the top of that with a wire attached to the top. Plant the vine in the middles so it can grow in opposite directions like it would on a regular trellis.

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Have you ever had a vine split? Did you attempt to get the vine to survive? Did you cut the vine off and grow more cordons? I had my first split last year and I cut the vine off low. I don’t know if the bolt method in the picture is a good solution but after 2 years it looks promising. The picture is from another muscadine grower.

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Cranking this year










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I’m also in zone 8a but in Alabama. Your vines appear to be growing at the pace as mine. They are just stating to bloom. Nice looking vineyard.

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Difference is I’ve never had any! Big first season

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Oh My made it to the trellis wire first and has been tipped.

Isons… is getting close.

Hopefully get both of these heading down the line soon.

TNHunter

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Looks good. You might get a few to sample next year.

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Oh My Produces a heavy load every year as of now.



Hall is another variety that has done well each year.

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My 20 or so wild muscadines that I transplanted to a nursery row are not growing as rapidly as i would expect. I have not pruned them to a single leader, so they are sort of bushy. Do wild muscadine not grow the vine as quickly as domesticated varieties?

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Yes, they grow as fast or faster, however, muscadines don’t like being transplanted. Grab a 5 gallon bucket and fill it with water, add 1 level teaspoon of miracle grow 15-30-15, and set the water beside a plant. Either put a small siphon hose in it so the water goes around the plant or drill a very small hole in the side near the bottom of the bucket. Give each plant another bucket of plain water every other day during summer. Add fertilizer one time per month. Do not give any fertilizer after August 20th.

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Been doing some research. Are wild muscadines generally considered to be early, midseason or late?

My Cowart vine is listed by UGA as midseason meaning (to me) around the 1st of September to the middle. Scuppernong is listed as late although to me mine seem to ripen about the same time as the Cowart’s. I read that Granny Val is very late - guessing that would be into October.

Local muscadines growing in the woods tend to adapt to their local climate. I would refer to them as mid-season for your area. Most of the ratings for early/mid/late are based on growing in climates similar to south Georgia and North Florida. It is not accurate anywhere I’ve grown muscadines with the exception of late and very late varieties. An overloaded muscadine will take several more weeks to mature the crop. Proper winter pruning and fertilizing will prevent this from occurring. Ison as an example can easily overload. I prune it back very heavily in winter and fertilize with a few pounds of 13-13-13 after harvest.

Said another way, all muscadines I’ve “successfully” grown mature the crop in a roughly 4 week period with very little variation.

Don’t bother with Granny Val. It is too cold sensitive. Ask how I know!! :slight_smile:

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All the muscadine varieties are getting bigger.
Paulk


Oh My

Lane

Black Beauty

Hall

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