My favorite nursery Nimes France

Just about 30 minutes of winding and dirt roads lies an oasis of greenery. The name of the nursery is Botanic. The French are very clean and orderly as you will see!

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That looks amazing! I’m so glad everything is well in France.

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Did you pick up anything? Thanks for sharing.

“Botanica”…I passed a former horse farm in Lexington KY with that name on a sign along the highway.
Copycat maybe?

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I made a typo, it’s Botanic.

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Tres belle. Je vois beaucoup de varietes de fruits que je ne peux pas trouver aux Etas Unis. A votre avis, en general, est-ce que vous pensez que les varietes de fruits en Europe est plus delicieuse que les fruits aux Etats Unis?

Very beautiful. I see many varieities of fruits that I cannot find in the United States. In your opinion, in general, do you think that the varieties of fruits in Europe are more delicious than the fruits in the United States?

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Oui. C’est le terroir, je pense et le chaleur. Les deux éléments fait pour conditions extraordinaires ! Aussi le raison pour le bon vin. Chaleur et terroir.

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@mrsg47
I know some French but not much, so here is a little help from Google translate::wink:

Yes. It’s the “terroir”, I think and the warmth. Both elements made for extraordinary conditions! Also the reason for good wine. Warmth and “terroir”.

Terroir (/tɛˈrwɑːr/, French : [tɛʁwaʁ]; from terre, “land”) is a French term used to describe the environmental factors that affect a crop’s phenotype, including unique environment contexts, farming practices and a crop’s specific growth habitat.

Is “land” an acceptable translation to you? Or you have an English equivalent term for 'terroir"?

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Yes, the English equivalent term is “terroir”. :wink:

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Thank you for your help.
From the definition from Oxford Languages, it seems like that term is for “wine” only, not “varieties of fruits” in general, as in Earlyriser’s question, so I wasn’t sure.

ter·roir

noun

  1. the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.
  • the characteristic taste and flavor imparted to a wine by the environment in which it is produced.

noun: goût de terroir ; plural noun: goût de terroirs

I am happy to learn something new. Thanks again.

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I was half-joking but the English language was never shy about borrowing words. En passant, zeitgeist was usually not to miss a bon mot, and becoming such a smorgasbord of words helped it to reach the status of de facto lingua franca.

Apropos, here is a funny quote (supposedly by James Nicoll) I recently came across:
“The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don’t just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary.”

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That’s the first nursery I’ve seen,where the plants are on automatic watering.bb

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I am not good in language so I always admire who can speak several. It takes dedication to learn thoroughly. My eldest brother knows every word like “computer” in Vietnamese, while I just use it as is. I think the US English represents the melting pot we have become, and I have no problem with that. :smiley:

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Earth and elements

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Not true, the term is used for anything that is grown in the earth.

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Very funny !

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Every terrace or patio uses the same drip system for pots. All on timers.

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Je suis en d’accord avec vous. Mais il y a une autre raison que je pense que les fruits et particulierement les legumes goutent plus delicieux que aux Etats Unis: les francais et les Europeans gardent plus de varietes de legumes. Ainsi, il y a plus de choix de legumes et plus de vieux varietes.

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C’est vrai!