My pawpaws are growing but…

The pace is terribly slooooooooow… No wonder! I’m 4b (Canada) which is 3b (USA) if not mistaken? If you prefer GPS positioning: Latitude - Longitude (DMS). 45° 19′ 0″ N, 72° 25′ 0″ W
||Latitude - Longitude (decimal) 45.3166667, -72.4166667

Living on a Prayer? Yes, that’s me. Many people are growing pawpaws successfully in the Montreal vicinity. I have tasted it and would like to grow my own. Maybe one day…

Cheers

Marc


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I am surprised you can even grow pawpaw in that cold of weather. Nursery here claim it only lives down to zones 5 or 4. Someone on here asked if their pawpaw did not make it and someone said their pawpaw are some of the last to come out. I guess it is the same with persimmon. It starts to make sense why they say they need something like 180 frost free days.

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Nice to see flowers! Your property looks very nice too. Good luck$

They go grow very sloooow here as well. I remember Jesse in Maine said it took 10 years for his to fruit. I am in year 3. It is wonderful that yours have flowers!

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Mine are also barely finished budding out this year here in Seattle. Last year one of them didn’t bud out until well into June. I assume it has something to do with night time temperatures? Mine are starting third year in the ground this spring, planted as little recently grafted sticks, and the largest one is barely past my waist. They usually turn fall colors in September, so there’s just one relatively brief summer growth spurt each year. You can tell they come from places with long, hot summers, and that they miss them here.

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I think people have talked about soil temperature. I guess soil temperature is a lot less volatile than air temperature so it can take a lot longer. Here many don’t plant until Memorial Day because around Memorial Day the nighttime temperature starts to rise to around 50 degrees which increases the soil temperature better for annuals.

Looking good so far! One thing that I have noticed growing pawpaw is that if you prune just one or two buds from the branches(while dormant) it invigorates the tree and will push a lot kore growth in response to being pruned. It has helped my smaller trees quite a bit. Try it next winter and see. You won’t loose anything by taking one or two buds off the tips of the branches(late winter).

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Inspiring to see that you’re getting flowers in such a cold climate.
How old are your trees, and do you have extra cold hardy cultivars?

I live even further north, but in Europe. Latitude:61°!!
We never get colder winter temps than -26°celsius (-15°F), so I ordered some trees this spring. Then I read about the GDD-requirements for pawpaws, which we do not acquire here. Not even close…

Trying to create a microclimate, I decided to plant them in raised beds (to achieve higher soil temperatures earlier in spring), and to put up temporary plastic windbreaks on their north side.
This combined with an unusually warm late spring/early summer has resulted in good growth.
These were put in ground on the 5.May as grey sticks, and on the 28.May this is what they looked like.

HALVIN

KENTUCKY CHAMPION

SUMMER DELIGHT (with shipping injury…)

I do not have much hope of ever getting fruit because of our climate, but this will be an interesting experiment.

Good luck with your pawpaws!
-Robert

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In my experience raised beds are complicated. While they become much warmer earlier on they also get colder as well. In my grow bags things have lived likely due to temperature of roots staying at 32 degrees due to snow. My ones that are not grow bags of had a 100% death rate even 2 zones below me.

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Yes, I intend to mulch heavily before winter around the “mound”, and remove it in spring.
Maybe it will work, maybe it won’t.
Considering it an experiment :blush:

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Sounds like a good plan, without some people doing zone pushing experiments some of us would be less encouraged to do experiments of our own. I hope you have success and I think it’s very possible you will. Good luck!

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