Name this Apple

Was asked to identify this apple.
Apple was still hanging on tree in Oct. in Kentucky. FB_IMG_1643751556649|690x924 FB_IMG_1643751842466

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How does Apple McAppleson sound? :laughing:

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Its a start…lol

I still had a couple Arkansas Black hanging into mid November. So, hanging into October is no record.

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No but not a early apple neither so rules that category out.

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The first photo kinda looks like a russet variety maybe, but the second photo looks like a different apple.

So we know it is not an early variety, so that narrows it down a bit, so that help. Before you spend too much time I think the first thing I would do is confirm there is a graft. If there is no graft on the trunk it is possible that tree was grown from seed and is not a named variety at all.

What does the bark and leaves look like?

Do the apples grow primarily on spurs along the branches or primarily at the tips of the branches?

Do you know the age or the history of the tree?

Is there another apple tree nearby that is a known variety? Perhaps they were purchased together as recommended pollinators.

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A lot of unanswered questions. I’m getting scions off that tree soon. I’ll check it out and personally talk with the lady that has the tree and find out as much as I can about the tree and pass along.

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In the past 9 months, did you find out anything?

No, nothing specific. I did get Scion wood, will get better discription plus taste also.

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I just thought you might have gotten more ‘evidence’ this fall, a year later.

There’s probably 100+ that it could be.

No, that apple bout 60 miles from me.
Lost touch with owner. Right now it’s an unnamed variety…

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This tree (left tree in center) is on the north side of my property. The apple is a little over ripe but looked similar to the ones still on (over 25 feet up). Last year when I saw them they were green so I don’t think they ever turn red.

Looks like a PEAR to me.

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That’s what I thought, the lenticels, the flesh texture, and the fat stem all make me think pear.[quote=“BlueBerry, post:13, topic:42624, full:true”]
Looks like a PEAR to me.
[/quote]

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Now that’s funny! I locked onto it being an apple since it was way back in the woods where I assumed that only crab apples would grow wild. But it could have been planted there many years ago before the land reverted to a forest.

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Yep. Definitely a pear. I only found one left on the ground, while past prime it was still really good. It had 2 seeds. Anyone an expert on starting from seeds? I would love to have a pear that drops during hunting season. The tree is a mile from any other pear that I know of. Any suggestions for a parent cultivar. It isn’t oblong like a partlet which is why I was guessing it was an apple.

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