Need Advice: Winter Tree Prep

Hello everyone.
I need some advice, I was told to use dormant spray in winter, but it’s not even winter yet and most of my trees either have no leaves or dying leaves, and I want to spray them with dormant spray now because in late winter they’ll be covered in snow, and I won’t be able to spray them at all.
Also, I want to spray my Harko nectarine with copper first and then dormant spray that way it doesn’t wake up with peach leaf curl. I’m also wondering if I should spray the Silver Logan and the Rio Oso Gem peaches with copper first as well since peach leaf curl seems to be a thing here and they are planted right next to each other.
My questions are, do you think it would be OK for me to spray dormant spray now on trees that have lost all leaves and if I do spray the peaches and nectarine with copper first, how long should I wait before spraying with dormant spray after?
Thanks in advance for all of your help.

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Hi Sarah,
You can do now as soon as foliage falls from the tree, and again a few weeks before bud swell in spring. I would apply copper first then a dormant oil or lime sulphur. Here is a similar advice from online search.
What is the best product to treat peach leaf curl?

Spray either in the fall just before defoliation normally occurs or in the spring just before the buds begin to swell or at both times if the problem is severe. Some fungicides which are effective include: chlorothalonil, Bordeaux mixture, lime sulfur, and fixed coppers.
Good luck
Dennis

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Lime sulfur is not appropriate for most of Utah.

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I already have copper spray so I will use that. Thanks!

Shouldn’t I wait between copper and dormant oil sprays?

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Im spraying the pear, apple and hazelnut trees with 40/60 water satin indoor latex paint for sunscald damage with some micronized sulfur and copper to repel chewers, and also wrap pears in hardware cloth. Zone 6

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Hi @Richard. I’m not in Utah, but I’m just curious why you say it’s inappropriate?

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My mentor, Tony Dembski, said, “Apply dormant oil for aphids, scale, and mites as needed above 40° F before silver tip.” I don’t use copper or sulfur on apples, so I have no opinion about them. Dormant oil acts to smother scale insects and mites as they come out of hibernation, so the temperature needs to be warm enough for them to be respiring or the effort and expense are wasted. Temperature must not be too warm or the oil evaporates before pests are asphyxiated.

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