New SWD control coming


#1

Don’t know if anyone has seen this but thought I’d let people read about it. Go here http://www.capitalpress.com/Research/20180607/artificial-fruit-could-control-spotted-wing-drosophila?mc_cid=1e34e2941d&mc_eid=5292de73c9#.WxtW2TTf0Zs.facebook


#2

Thanks for the article link. Will be interesting if the control substance is available to home growers eventually. Strawberries season in Oregon is well before peak SWD season, so this would better apply to caneberries and cherries in this region.

I will be attending the Caneberry Field Day at this same location next month.

I will inquire if the new diverting substance is more effective than merely using vinegar traps that also distract the SWD.


#3

@LarryGene been trying for two years to get out there but life gets in the way. I sure hope it will be available for home as well, appreciate you asking. Also let me know if any interesting blackberry is coming up.


#4

@LarryGene how was it. I read an article where there research plot was hit with rose stem girdler which is what I think I have. Must have been a great presentation there about that. Any news on SWD Controll?


#5

fullplate, thanks for the reminder. About 40 people in attendance.

The rose stem girdler, a small beetle, was a topic; a dead specimen and some damaged canes were presented. Spray timing was critical. For a large research plot, the plot edges were the most affected. A local grower described an entire row of caneberries toppled and Black Diamond plantings completely damaged for 4 years running until the correct ID and spray timing was made this year.

SWD: Pending patents and release (2019-2020) are a spray-on for fruit skin toughening and an artificial fruit attractant for use as a decoy. I think both of these products would not be well suited to the home gardener, would require heavy-duty spray equipment. There is also a native parasitic wasp “Samurai Wasp” that can be effective. But for the home gardener, it might be similar to buying ladybugs and watching them fly away. Imported parasite use is still awaiting approval.
A small container of ~200 wasps was presented; each wasp is slightly larger than one SWD fly.