Pacific Northwest Fruit Growers

Do you live in the Pacific Northwest?
Post here so other in the area can know who you are and what you are interested in.
Also, feel free to chime in and talk about where you are and what ever is on your mind.

P.S. I original thought about calling the topic “Pacific Northwest Fruits and Nuts” :wink:

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My name is Mark Hancock and I live in the Portland Area and I am a homeowner and I am interested in growing fruit in my yard.

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Hi Mark and other PNW fruit growers! I live in Seattle, WA. I grow figs, pears, plums, Asian persimmons, jujubes, grapes, mulberries, strawberries, raspberry, blueberries, pomegranates, fuzzy and hardy kiwis. If you are a local please get in touch! We always enjoy meeting other fig growers in the area! Thank you!

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Thank you @markshancock for starting a regional thread for us!

My name is Winn and I live in Seattle where I’ve got a standard city lot with a 300ish square ft greenhouse. I’m mostly interested in trying to get some cold-hardy avocados to survive outside here, but I’m also planting my yard with various things like loquat, feijoa, pawpaw, hardy kiwis & others.

I’m always happy to gift avocado trees to anyone in the region who has a somewhat protected place for a tree or two, as long as you understand this is a hardiness trial where many trees probably won’t make it!

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Tacoma, WA
Plums (and crosses)
Apples
Nectarine
Berries (lots) blueberry, raspberry, strawberry, blackberry, honeyberry
Peach
Pear
Figs (lots)
Avocado (fingers crossed)
Loquat
Lime
Pomegranate
Grapes
Cherry
Apricot
Goumi
Huckleberry red

Maybe:
Jubjube
Pawpaw
Banana
Ice Cream Bean

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Hi,
My name is Brady and I’m in Redmond,WA.My major in college was environmental horticulture,which wasn’t pursued as a vocation.
Years went by and I grew a few things like vegetables and small plants,at different residences.But it was something remembered,that an old botany teacher mentioned,or rather how he said the word,Serviceberry,only pronouncing it,Sarvisberry,(which is actually another correct way),that started,literally my hobby,as it is now.
I planted one from a local nursery and then moved on with Blueberries,Blackberries and a few trees.

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Hi Mark, I’m Chris. I live on Guemes Island, one of the northernmost reaches of the PNW. On 10 acres I grow apples, pears, plums, and cherries as espalier; peaches, figs, and hazelnuts as free-standing semi-dwarfs; and persimmons, loquat, and almonds under cover. In my greenhouse I grow citrus and tomatoes. Because I am 5-10 degrees cooler than others in the maritime PNW, you’ll always find me fretting about the lack of heat!

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I live in Portland=PDX. Permaculture food forest. Normal fruits like apples, pears, plums, cherries, plus unusual stuff like pawpaws, Am. persimmons, cactus, figs, autumn olives,mulberries, quince, lots of green leafies and herbs. Some mushrooms.
John S
PDX OR

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I’m in SW Washington State, 25 minute drive Northeast of the Portland Airport.

I grow all sorts of temperate fruits, some perennial herbs, and sometimes a small annual vegetable plot. I was heavily involved with the Home Orchard Society, serving as a board member, Vice President and event volunteer.

I’d give advice to newbies, eavesdrop on the apple ID table, facilitate speakers, make announcements, and help teach grafting.

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I’m in east Portland and growing fruit in my suburban yard to supplement my family. Lots of berries, apples, pears, plums but also prepping for climate change by experimenting with more Mediterranean things like figs, grapes, herbs, peaches, lavender and fruiting olives (which have been through multiple winters and haven’t died here yet).

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Have you heard about the Jenny kiwi? Self fertile, large furry fruit and hardy. Plus the fruit ripens very early, much sooner than the Hayward.

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yes jenny fuzzy kiwi it should be medium size fruit since it is self fruitful only the cross pollinating fuzzy kiwis can get the large size fruit.

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Hi I’m Carole and live on Shaw near Chris. Moved up year full time about a year ago with the majority of my apples, pears, euro plums, cherries, figs, and blackberries. There was already a small orchard here of apples, pears, a plum and a filbert. First year I topworked three of the apples to favorite varieties. This year I will graft another asian pear and euro plum, plus add trees on m111 so not to make more deer and racoon food. Also adding more Asian and euro plums, figs and a mulberry. I’m really looking forward to the March 5th Winter Field Day at WSU Mount Vernon! I thought I was about done but ended up getting more trees.

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There are very few Mediterranean species that won’t grow up here. Have you ever been to the lavender fields in the San Juan islands? Stunning. Furry kiwis do excellent, especially the Jenny which is self fertile and ripen very early. Nikita and taraka feijoa will give consistent yields with early ripening. If you are willing to prepare a raised bed against a south exposed wall you’ll get lots of high quality yuzu, sudachi and ichandrin. Pomegranate so far have proved difficult to get fruit, but evidently there is variety grown in yalta and Croatia that yield in the equivalent of zone 8. If you like nopalitos a type of thornless opuntia grows fantastic in PNW. The prickly pear are slightly watery but make very good jam. The new paddles are good diced, boiled and then sautéed for salad. Nopalitos are eaten widely in Mexico. Unfortunately, without a greenhouse avocados aren’t happening north of Brookings.

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Hi everyone, I’m Stan and I’m also located in Tacoma. I’ve had the privilege to meet @DennisD and @jfiorini through this forum, hope to meet more of you in the future. I’m growing different types of fruit and berries and enjoy learning about what’s possible in our climate.

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It is also advisable to have another fuzzy male even with the Jenny. I’ve heard rumors that other hardy varieties can also pollinate the Jenny. I have so many kiwi of all types I don’t know what’s going on in their sex life. I just leave them to it and enjoy the berries.

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What’s your citrus set up? The only ‘hardy’ citrus I like that doesn’t require fretting over is yuzu. I quite like those, particularly the sudachi. The other citrus I like requires a bit of effort. Some I keep outside and wrap when very cold. Other I keep in a heated greenhouse. I maintain a low of about 40-45 and that keeps them happy. I’d imagine you must have more problems with lack of heat rather than too much cold. Though your region is pretty sunny for being so maritime. I mean lemons aren’t very happy in some coastal areas of Northern California due to foggy summers.

You grow ice cream beans up here? I had no clue that was possible. I’m sure you hear that a lot. How well do they do?

Thanks for the ideas and info. Our neighbors have pomegranates and limes growing without a greenhouse here. It is a sheltered south facing location so it’s pretty warm and bright.

Has anyone had success with apricots here? I’m thinking of trying an informal fan espalier for ease of maintenance and possibly covering in clear plastic over winter to protect from the cold wet conditions.

The right type of pomegranate will yield. The citrus up here has to be one of the ‘hardy’ varieties to be outside without a cover and wrapped on coldest nights. Sudachi and ichandrin are quite good and will provide lots of yuzu with the right accommodations. This guy is the guru of PNW citrus. Follow him and you be picking lemons in zone 8: