Pacific Northwest Fruit Growers

The Aphids can be very small.Try uncurling some of the tightest leaves and look with a magnifier.
The Aphids last Spring.Did they cause the leaves to curl?

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There are green objects on the leaf underside in the first image that look like aphids and not like moisture drops.

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Yes, last year the aphids caused the same issue.

What’s is most confounding is that this tree is an espalier with 4 different varieties, 2 on the right side, 2 on the left. This lead curling phenomenon only happens on 1 side. The other side is completely unaffected.

Last year I saw lots of aphids. They are green but very easy to spot. I have looked very carefully and haven’t seen any. And if there are aphids on this tree why only on one side? Is it possible that plum aphids would only attack one side of the tree? That’s seems highly unlikely.

Plus I have been vigilant with spraying for aphids. I’ve also sprayed extensively for fungus too.

What’s is most confounding is that this tree is an espalier with 4 different varieties, 2 on the right side, 2 on the left. This lead curling phenomenon only happens on 1 side. The other side is completely unaffected.

Last year I saw lots of aphids. They are green but very easy to spot. I have looked very carefully and haven’t seen any. And if there are aphids on this tree why only on one side? Is it possible that plum aphids would only attack one side of the tree? That’s seems highly unlikely.

Plus I have been vigilant with spraying for aphids. I’ve also sprayed extensively for fungus too.

Yes,sometimes only one branch is affected on a tree.Mine get them every year.This time I was diligent and sprayed oil and soap 2-3 times before bloom and the only place they are noticeable,are on the end of a potted Plum’s branch,that was probably missed entirely.

Just thought I’d share here in case anyone is interested – I created a project page on the Experimental Farm Network for my cold-hardy avocado project:

https://experimentalfarmnetwork.org/project/36

I’ll start distributing trees around this time next year, so I’m mostly launching this now to gauge interest and help find other cultivars to add to the multi-graft breeding trees.

This is a rather long-shot experiment, I will admit, but I’m committed to sticking with it for many years to come, and hope to eventually test hundreds or even thousands of seedlings to see if the genetic variability of avocados will produce any trees capable of doing even reasonably well in our climate.

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Please help me.
I have a lot of fig trees 1-3 gallon containers, but I’m having a hard time
marketing them.

I’m in Port Orchard, Washington
are there any Plant sales where I could bring them?
Near Port Orchard

Does anyone here successfull with Candy heart pluerry in Pacific Northwest? Thank you for information. Vincent.

I found this one
http://www.multnomahmastergardeners.org/incredible-edibles

I have candy heart 2nd leaf this year that has a light fruit set, hopefully I get to try it. I think this was an easy year for pollination but it’s promising. it flowers about a week late compared to other japanese plums which is also a good sign

I should add it has the most ridiculous straight-up growth habit of any of my japanese plums. I tried branch bending but it just ripped so I’m letting it go, it’s in a hedge anyway so it’s ok

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Thank you for information Michael. Your areas maybe better than mine. Too wet for Candy heart early bloom habit. I got rid of mine but would like to try to plant it again. Let’s us know how the its fruits taste. Thank you @z0r .

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Unfortunately it’s in Oregon
I live in Western Washington near Seattle.

@abqspeachless I got a chance to post a bunch of pictures for the dwarf crabapple tree today. Here’s a link (I figured it would be best to start a dedicated thread to follow its evaluation). I was able to get a fair number of these root grafted this year so I will bury their grafts and get the clones growing own-root.

I feel like an oddball in eastern WA! we are dry zone 6 where I am, none of the coastal plants will grow

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Welcome to the forum, Anji! You’re not the only eastern WA/high desert member on here. E.g., @SpokanePeach, but many others too. What kind of fruit are you growing, or interested in growing?

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I do figs and olives in a hoophouse, Meyer lemon indoors. then we have plum, raspberry, white mulberry and gooseberries outside! I put in northern pawpaw’s and two dwarf apple trees last year, and would really like to try to push the zone. we have a pretty warm dry microclimate in the back.

I do a veggie garden too and native plants out in front of our place

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I lost virtually all of my asian pear blossoms to pseudomonas/blossom blast this year. I sprayed lime sulfur but not diligently (I had it out for peaches and the pears/apples got the extra). does anyone have a spray program that they like for this? I have a bag of kocide 3000 so I can do copper next year I guess

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Welcome Anji!

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Me too. Last year was the first I sprayed copper and also the first I got more than 2 Hosui. Also it was pretty dry spring.

This year, Asian Pear set looks terrible

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thanks yeah I’ll try copper next year. the PNW guide has timing for champ (copper) as “before fall rains and again before spring growth starts”. last year I did copper as a dormant spray only and had a full crop.

this is a letdown, the pears were SO good last year and I know this tree is going to grow too much without a fruit load and it’s already the right size