Pawpaw question

I am planning to plant a couple Pawpaw trees on my north facing wall in Illinois.
Been reading and doing research on them but have not been able to fund answers to a few questions:

  1. Will they do well in the shade of a north facing wall under a large tree canopy? It gets filtered shade earlier in the day but during the afternoon they will end up getting more shade.

  2. Can i trim them down and keep them as large 4 to 5 foot shrubs? Will they still produce well

  3. Will they attract pollinators that are considered pests to my other fruit trees?
    (Cherry, peach, nectarine, hazelnut, currants, blueberries, grapes)

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The way pawpaw grow in nature is the grow in shade and then emerge into the sunlight. It is even recommended you put a shade cloth over them the first 2 years. I remember reading on a website they recommended heading them at around 8 feet. 4-5 is small as that is smaller than your average person. They are pollinated mainly by beetles and flies.

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You could plant them there but the location and your need for pruning will likely not be a recipe for success. :disappointed:

Ladybird beetles are one of the most common pollinators (here, at least), which are highly beneficial insects. Otherwise as mentioned above the pollinators are houseflies and other fly species which I would not expect to be harmful to the plants you mentioned.

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That’s interesting.Maybe I will get some during flowering time.

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I could be wrong but that sounds to me like way too much shade unless it has worked for someone else who has gotten a decent amount of fruit in that location. Or unless you just want foliage and not much in the way of fruit.

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Yeah, I agree with this. Pawpaws can grow well in shade, but tend to grow taller and lankier in habit (in order to reach more sunlight). Pruning to keep them 4-5 ft with that habit might be challenging and will likely lead to having to prune off a lot of your fruiting potential each year (pawpaws bloom on previous years growth). In full sun they grow bushier and are able to produce more fruit in a more compact size. I would try to find them a sunnier location if at all possible.

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Ok thanks for the reaponses.
I read somewhere, they could be trimmed to be kept small, but didnt know if it would work well in more shady areas, or if they would attract pollinators that would be pests for my other fruit.

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