Peach/Nectarine Variety Recommendations for PA

I do like a nice smith skinned nectarine, but based on the additional challenges, I’ll probably stick with peaches. I think I’m narrowing it down between Glenglo, Redhaven, Carolina Belle and Madison.

If I only have room for two, any thoughts on which to choose?

This might be a silly question, but for pests, is there any such thing as resistant varieties? It sounds like peach fuzz may be helpful vs smooth skinned nectarines, but is there anything else I should be considering (ripening timing, acidity, etc) that might reduce the pressure?

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The earlier a fruit ripens the shorter the war, so survival is more likely and with less fighting.

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This is so true, Alan. I’m happily harvesting my Glenglo and Silver Gem while my Intrepids have at least another month left. There always seems to be more bugs as the summer progresses as well making the task of keeping the fruit undamaged harder. The same applies with fungal diseases which proliferate in the humidity and heat.

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I’m in PA. You absolutely cannot go wrong with Red Haven. Great for fresh eating, great for canning, very reliable - produces at least a small crop every year for me. This from a relatively long lived tree that’s been here since I moved here in 2009. Winner.

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Yes Red Haven is a great peach. My dad planted his first ones in the early fifties. That was the same time that my parents got their first home freezer. One of the features of Red Havens was that they were a great peach to freeze.

We had a block of Golden Jubilee, Hale Havens, and Elberta. The Jubilee’s mostly went to the local cannery, the Hale Haven’s went the fresh market and the Elberta’s went to the canners and the fresh market. The Elberta’s were a later peach that ripened after the start of school and that was when a lot of housewives did their canning. At least that is what I remember of my childhood from the forties and the fifties growing up in Western NY.

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Redhaven always gets my vote. It defines everything that is a peach.
The last time I got Redhavens from my trees 2 years ago (the trees are still small so the cropping’s been erratic) I did have a bacterial spot issue. I haven’t read about anyone else having a bacterial spot issue on redhaven so I might just be a red herring.
Evelynn is a relatively new release from Rutgers (it’s sold through Adams county nursery) and it’s supposed to ripen at the same time as Redhaven and it’s supposed to maintain a better firmness. As far as taste it’s supposed to be subacid (relatively sweet). I’m not sure how your taste runs…if you like the quintessential ‘peach’ taste Redhaven’s your man. Linvilla orchards has evelynn trees that are bearing age if you want to taste test.
There’s two others that have been written about extensively here that ripen with redhaven + or - a couple days; 15-007 and 9a-007. I also remember one of the Stellar series varieties coming in roughly the same time. Stellar varieties (anything with Star in the name) are worth taking a look at. I can never recall anyone ever having anything other than kind words about any of the Stellar varieties.
I hope this helps

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It sounds like Redhaven may still be the standard. If it’s an easy grower, I may have to plant it.

Does anyone have any experience with Westbrook Nectarine? Just wondering if I went the nectarine route with one of my trees if I could avoid some of the issues with one that early. According to Rutger’s extension, it has good flavor, but can it really be good that early? Would I dodge a lot of the rot and insect pressure with something that early?

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Redhaven’s very grower friendly from my experience

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