Problems last year. Please help so they don’t happen again


#1

I am new here and still relatively new to fruit growing. I would be grateful for any advice. We live in the midlands of SC (8b) and have an acre orchard with apples, plums, peaches, pears, brambles, grapes, and blueberries. I’d like to say we’ve had great success but not yet. I took pics of different sick plants mid to late summer . I hope someone can tell me what I did wrong.

Many thanks in advance for your help!!! (This is the first time I’ve ever attached photos so if it doesn’t work or there are questions let me know and I’ll turn it over to my tech expert(spouse).


#2

Somebody more experienced will contribute soon I’m sure…in the mean time google pear psylla and see if the damage match what you got.


#4

I don’t think it was bug damage. I don’t remember seeing any signs of bugs but thanks for idea.


#5

Hey. I’m not sure either but looks nutritional maybe. Motting between the veins of the leaves. Do you fertilize? Do you mulch the trees? Honestly if that was my tree I wouldn’t be too concerned, tree looks pretty healthy otherwise.


#6

No concerns. Have a look around sometime and you’ll see that maples or oaks or dogwoods or fruit trees or nut trees or azaleas or boxwood / you name it. Nothing is perfect.

The leaf in the center of your photo looks to me like a combination of an imbalance of sunlight and water, mainly (as do) the other leaves. You see the leaf is more at the top of your specimen and has more blemish than those below. Well that’s because it and the others above are shading the others below (more sunlight.) So chalk it up to sunlight and water intake fluctuations. I don’t see any nutrient issues but rather purely cosmetic issues.

Should you see something other than cosmetic effects such as brown or black patches or holes or leaves rolled up or wilting leaves, or leaves half brown and half green or other phenomenon then you’re looking at potential issues of which some are more serious than others.

Do look around sometime and you’ll notice that maples or oaks or dogwoods or fruit trees or nut trees or azalea or boxwood or rhododenden [you name it] have blemishes- especially while it’s hot with humid or dry air during summer.

Dax