Pushing out side limbs on Goldrush

This is a Goldrush scion that I grafted 20160218. It started out slow but then it took off upward without any side limbs to about 24". I cut it back on 20160529 and on a whim I grafted the top that I just cut off below and to my surprise the three scions didn’t waste any time pushing out new growth. Sometimes you try something new (new to me) and get lucky. Picture taken today.

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So you grafted them with the leaves on the scion wood ?

I carefully trimmed the leaves off and completely wrapped the scion with parafilm. The leaves are from new growth. They have already pushed outward since I grafted to about 2".

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Another picture

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Interesting concept. You might run into trouble however with the narrow crotch angles of the grafts; it will want to split with any weight at all on the branches, and will have vigorous vegetative growth. You could have waited until it was about 5’ tall, then topped it and notched above each bud the next April to encourage branching


Or, you could do a “knip-boom” tree (“cut tree”) where you whack it back to 36" tall in the fall, and then snip new growth back 1/2" and apply BA hormone to encourage a lot of little branches. You can see a great video on this at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UyNuQlplCs

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I am unimpressed by the roots on those K-B trees, seeing as that is supposed to be one of the selling points with that growing system. I have also never seen a commercial nursery stake every tree like that. Seems like a lot of unnecessary labor involved with the staking process. Sorry to side track your thread Auburn.

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No problem. Post anything you want too. It does look like a large investment of time.

Your right. I put in some with the same angles two years ago during there dormant period. They grew out about 2-3’ and I had to gradually bend them down during this growing season. Worked well but it did required being extra careful. Bill

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They stake them at this nursery with a self-driving tractor
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6C8EqjOP0M

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@applenut. Nice videos. It is always interesting to see how things are done on the big stage. Bill

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The K-B trees are trained to have lots of branches by the second year, as this allows them to fruit heavily the year after planting. The dwarfing rootstocks have to be supported permanently in the orchard, and many places in Europe also use hail netting over the entire orchard. With this infrastructure combined with fertigated drip irrigation and high density planting of very expensive nursery trees, the grower needs to get a quick return on investment. Their goal is to get the tree up to the top wire as soon as possible in order to have a fruiting wall, and so it is always a gamble the first couple years between allowing heavy fruiting and thinning harder for more vegetative growth.

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This is an update. Since the first pictures I cut the top again and side grafted the section. It also took. The angles were narrow but have been adjusted and I will let them grow out to 3-4’. I’m also posting a picture of a pear that was side grafted in a similar manner in 2015.

Pic 001 and 002 Goldrush

Pic 003 is a 2015 pear side graft

Those trees are very pampered! Wow, I think the operation is incredible. Must be expensive.

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Your so right. I only have about 20 dwarf apple trees and they all get a lot of attention. The amount of attention would not be practical for people with bigger operations but it allows me to keep them as an enjoyable hobby. Hope your transition has gone well. Bill

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Still in process, haven’t left yet!

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Hey Bill,
So as I understand this, in the spring you took off the top shoot of a tree and grafted it lower?
And the angle was narrow (a concern to some but I have mine trellised) so you ‘adjusted’ it. Can you give more words about ‘adjusted’ it? That right angle looks perfect.

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See PM. Thanks