Questions not deserving of a whole thread

Just build extensions for the tallest t-posts you can find if you dont need that many 8’ t-posts. PVC pipe or lumber works.

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7’ t-posts make about a 5’ tall fence after driving 'em in the ground. Also keep in mind… Deer can jump very high, or very far, but not very high and very far at the same time. More work and more expense but a double fence of a shorter height can be effective too.

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@AndySmith .
Wood posts, cedar ,locust .or other for short term.
Or pipe / posts used for chain link fencing should be available in suitable lengths .
2 inch x 10 ft lengths of pvc electric conduit may work , ( 2ft. In ground )and it may be insulated enough to not require insulators ?

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Question regarding new Asian persimmons and temperatures prior to dormancy: I planted Saijo, Ichi-ki-kei-jiro and the hybrids Nikita’s Gift and Rosseyanka this spring. They’re not showing signs of dormancy yet—still green, no obvious signs of fall color. And we’ve only had one light frost. There will likely be another frost tonight. What worries me, however, is Sunday through Tuesday nights. Some forecasts give temperatures which could drop below 25F on one or more of these nights. Should I cover my young kakis—and maybe also Nikita? (I assume—I hope not incorrectly—that Rosseyanka would be okay.) Or should I let them experience this sudden temperature dip? Thanks!

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Does anyone know what variety of pomegranate this might be? My husband brought several (at $3.99 each!) home the other night, from the grocery store.

I thought they were ‘Wonderful’, but when I opened them up - the arils were much lighter in color and clear at the bottom.
And these are the sweetest pomegranates I’ve ever tasted! They don’t even taste like a pomegranate! Also . . . they are very large! Much larger than any ‘Wonderful’ I’ve seen. The sticker said ‘Juicy’ on it. But I don’t know if that referred to the variety - or the distributor. ?

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I believe that Juicy is the brand, regardless every time I see pomegranates with the Juicy sticker on it, they seem to be a different variety. I never know what variety they are.

Looks like a utah sweet grown in the central valley…

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I know ‘they say’ that there is no such thing as a stupid question . . .
but I have a stupid question. :roll_eyes:

Is there a reason why we plant fruit trees in the spring, and not in the fall, when we could be allowing the roots to develop over the winter?

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No. I plant in the fall all the time. But I am in North Florida.

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@PomGranny

It is not a stupid question but actaully we can olant and do plant fruit trees in the fall ONCE THEY ARE ALREADY DORMANT.

Mike

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I plant bare root plants in both spring and fall, have pretty much the same result

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If you had room for only 2 apple varieties and wanted a no spray/lowest maintenance approach on a tiny lot with Cedar trees down the road, which would you choose? I am in zone 6A (western PA) and it is typically humid, and I can place whatever kind of soil works best. Along that line, should I scrap apples as a strategy altogether and go with additional persimmons instead to avoid issues with disease?

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Out of the thousands of trees I have planted at work (all kinds, typically not fruit trees) our success rate for a few years out is typically a bit higher for spring planting than fall planting. We are talking probably 10% or so but I don’t have the exact data. So as long as you water it, your trees will probably do just fine in the fall in most cases.

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williams pride and liberty come to mind. i have them grafted on my y. transparent and sargeants crab. though I’m much cooler its just as humid here and 1 side of my property is lined with w. cedars. if you can stagger with other fruits it would probably help with diseases. make sure theres good airflow also.

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Thanks Steve! I am thinking about alternating them with pawpaw based on your suggestion instead of putting them beside each other. I know pruning is very important to apples, I will have to watch some videos to make sure I do it correctly when the time comes. By the way, I have family in Blue Hill ME who I visit almost every year. It is one of my favorite states and I plan to retire there some day and begin a little homestead. I am glad to see you have success with getting stuff to grow all the way up north, it gives me hope that I will be able to as well!

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I live in west PA as well and looked into disease-resistant apples a year or 2 ago. Apples grow pretty well here, even with my clay and shale heavy soil, so I would consider growing a couple even if they are more difficult to maintain than persimmons. I did a lot of research to find some good options for early, mid, and late season varieties.

I fully agree with moose71’s choices of William’s Pride and Liberty. Those were my top 2 picks to get scions of! I also got scions of King David, Pristine(not rust resistant), and Ashmead’s Kernel.

Some other varieties that could be worth considering that are resistant to scab, rust, and blight are: Enterprise, Redfree, Macfree, Freedom, Novamac, & Priscilla.

Make sure the 2 you get are compatible to cross-pollinate.

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love the Maine coast but not the summer people coming from the cities. if you go east of bar harbor you can avoid the summer zoo . the further east you go on the coast the better. i have a friend in Machias. he’s a sea food dealer. its a fishermans town. love going to the bars there and listen to the old salts. loud and boisterous with the heavy downeast accents. they work hard and play harder! the most ‘’ real’’ people you’ll ever meet. takes some getting used to as they are loud and get louder as they get a few in em’.

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i just ordered enterprise and freedom scions from fedco! you physic Tony? lol! i hate spraying so I’m trying to stack my odds in my favor.

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Haha, nah I just spend too much time researching apple varieties. I hear you, I hate spraying too. I just wish I could find more information on cultivar resistance to rots, since I have an issue with that here.

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yeah me too. from my experience and what I’ve read, apple cultivars that are resistant to blight and scab tend to be resist to other rots as well. maybe others with more experience with apples will chime in on this.

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