Rooted cuttings question


#1

I’ve managed to get roots on some seedling peach cuttings, and now I have a question for some of the experts on this forum. These cuttings are about 7 inches long overall and I am roughly 30 days from first frost. What is the best way to get these through the winter? Indoors in a pot? Buried under sawdust outside? I really don’t think they have enough time to develop and harden off for the winter, but I am not at all sure of that. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.


#2

It would help is you had your zone and location in your profile. How cold does it get?


#3

High desert of Idaho. Nearly always reaches minus 10 at least a few times during winter. Minus 20 for a few nights is not uncommon, and 25 below happens once in a while, though not routinely. Needless to say, peaches do not thrive here. These cuttings are from a Reliance seedling which is the only survivor out of 100 seeds planted several years ago.


#4

Thirty days from the first frost? Where the hell are you? Siberia? :rofl:


#5

Over the past 20 years, I’ve seen at least one lite frost every month except July. Had one knocked every single leaf off my tomato plants on the 8th of June a few years ago. Singed the edges of my squash leaves on the 28th of Aug. once. Normally the early ones don’t kill things, just get you in the mood for autumn. Always get a fairly hard freeze during Oct.


#6

I am not sure these little cuttings will withstand much in the way of frost. I can’t imagine they will be hardened off enough to take even a light freeze.


#7

They should be ok with temperatures in the 20s but will lose there leaves. Once they lose their leaves I would keep them indoors at a temperature below 50 and above 20.


#8

In my opinion they need much more time and larger roots to be left outside for the winter, I would put them under a light in a heated area of your house and let them get a kick start for next season. I have had great luck with Contender maybe try one of those as well.


#9

Do you have a root cellar or an attached garage or even an enclosed front porch?

Scott


#10

Have been under the impression that they need to go dormant over winter. If that is not the case, I can just pot them up and leave them in the room where they are at. I just bought a contender this year, and have high hopes for it, but have to wait and see. Thanks.


#11

No root cellar or front porch, attached garage is heated. I will be real happy if they do not need to go dormant for the winter.


#12

While they do need to do go dormant most plants you can skip dormancy for one year especially if you are trying to get more vegetative growth.


#13

Thank you!! That solves my problem. I already have the lights, so will just need to pot them up.Thanks again.


#14

Why don’t you want them to go dormant?

I keep a few trees non-dormant over the winter, but these are non-temperate trees…

If they are kept non-dormant over the winter you will find that they may face spider mites as well as many other things (over-watering is far easier with non-dormant plants)

Do you have a basement?

Scott


#15

sounds like www have similar weather but I’m sure i get more rain.