Salvageble?


#21

Well here it is. I’ll post back here later in the spring and we’ll just see what happens.


#22

If you hope for the strongest possible growth reaction you really need to plant that tree into the ground. As I understand the tree was in the ground before and didn’t grow well. But nonetheless a potted tree will always grow much weaker than the same tree planted into the ground. Plus that container seems to be on the small side for a tree older than a year or so.


#23

Just an update on my Santa Rosa. It’s in the ground and as you can see it’s budding out really well. Thanks for the advice everyone. I’ll keep you posted.


#24

Can I remove the branches growing towards the center now without stunting growth?


#25

Yeah, looks good! Just pinch the parts you don’t want off with your fingernails, leaving a little bit on the trunk or branch, etc.

If you know you’ll never want a branch in a particular spot, rub it off from the trunk itself. But I think pinching is safer, even though you’ll have to do it again later as it regrows.


#26

I’m very happy with how well this tree is growing and developing. It appears I’m going to have plenty of well placed scaffolds. I just want to say thank you for everyone’s advice. Should I start training the new scaffolds now?


#27

Hang clothespins on them to pull them down. They look a little tender to try to tie down. They’re easy to accidentally rip off!

Edit: the ones that are barked up and stiff can be tied down now. Make sure to tie around a barky part and not the soft green parts.


#28

I just wanted to post and update on my Santa Rosa. It is growing vigorously and I will have plenty of scaffolds to choose from in the winter. This is after cutting spring growth back by a third with subsequent regrowth.