Uralian Butter/Uralian Bitter

Anyone know anything about Uralian apples?

A while back this description from Maple Valley Orchard caught my eye: “Uralian Butter: A large, greenish, yellow apple with some russeting. Best in flavor with unique buttery aftertaste. Early bearer.” An intriguing flavor description! And while there’s a few hits online, there’s very little info on this apple. But then Fruitwood Nursery had a “Uralian Bitter” apple scion for sale this year under their cider apples (no description). I assumed this was a typo and a mis-file, until my local scion exchange also had a Uralian Bitter on the cider table! Are these different apples, and if not, which is correct? Is the butter/bitter name confusion making people categorize them oppositely? Google also says there is a Golden Uralian and a Uralian Winter apple, neither of which has much of a web presence. Anyone growing these?

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There are a few Golden Uralian trees around here. They are early, hardy, and pretty sweet, which I normally don’t care for but in this case I like them. I have a tree but it is just a young thing that hasn’t fruited yet.

Based, on the NPGS database, it’s “Uralian Butter”. “Bitter” is a misspelling. It’s very difficult for me to imagine someone would call an apple variety “bitter” in Russian (bitter tasting apples are valuable in cider making but cider is virtually non-existent in Russia).

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Ok, it’s confirmed — it’s butter, not bitter. If you can read Russian, this article describes many Uralian apple varieties, and “Уральское масляное” is one of them.

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I circled Uralian Butter at Maple Valley once, but decided on things like Tolman Sweet, Golden Sweet, Honeyball and Frostbite instead.

Galinas on here is Russian. maybe she could translate it for you.

I don’t need translation, I can read it just fine. :slight_smile:

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