Wangoes, new Mango interspecific hybrids

Dr Richard Campbell for the last 30 years has been attempting Mango interspecific hybrids between Mangifera, domestic cultivars of extraordinary quality with wild Mangifera.
He is about to release 2 such unique fruits.
Please watch video first then contribute ideas & opinions.
One of his first 2 interspecific hybrids is polyembryonic!
He is grafting these onto dwarf root stock.
Grafts have been taking very well.

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If wango are to mango what pluot are to plum then wango will be very good. It is very early in the development of wango. Dr Campbell just tasted his first one. So there is a lot of sorting out and additional breeding and testing to do.

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Will have to schedule a visit to the Mango Men orchard.

Have you ever done any interspecific hybrids?
Do you know of individuals who have who could mentor me?
R Neal Peterson said: very unlikely that you are going to be able to get a good (Asimina triloba x Annona Reticulata Fernandez) interspecific, as the ploidy doesn’t match.
Peterson: I have been attempting to hybridize Asimina for decades & am years away from having something worthy of marketing.
An interspecific would be even more difficult.
Richard Campbell–“You never know until you try, good luck!”.
Suggestions?

Sorry I can’t help you on either end. I do know that a lot is done just by normal cross breeding. The Zaigers have mother trees in big pots and coordinate blooming to get the crosses they want. Zaigers in Modesto CA are well known for all kinds of stone fruit crosses like pluots.

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I’m familiar with Zaiger Genetics & Dave Wilson Nursery.
Tom Spellman is the representative from Wilson to my area.
An interspecific on Genus Prunus is much easier than Annonaceae.
I recently joined an Annonaceae fantastics group.
Will ask there.
As far as I understand, only a few interspecific hybrids so far in Annonaceae.

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Zaiger Genetics has over 800 interspecifics which they have not released yet.
Work in progress trees.
So sounds difficult, even for something with the same ploidy.
But like Richard Campbell said, Never know until you try!

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I have a few questions on this that likely won’t be answered for along time. The reason I say along time is the entire process has to start of figuring things out and patenting/trademarking the fruit. So my first question is how many years are we looking at until release. My second question comes with the end of the video. Will he release the plants to the general public but have it in your stores like the Zaiger family does (I can grow pluots in my yard and pay the patent fee or I can pay to get it at the store) or will this become a candy grape situation where they will license it out to growers and have it sold only at stores. If it is a pluot situation than many on this forum care but if it is a candy grape situation well no one on this forum will care since you can’t grow it. In fact the only reason the Zaiger family likely sells the pluot is because they work closely with Dave Wilson Nursery so they likely get a lot of money from that. Another question is what is the hardiness on it. Pluots are hardy to zone 5 but apriums are only hardy to zones 6 or 7 for example.

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Richard is as famous & respected in Mangoes as Zaiger is in Genus Prunus.
Dr Richard Campbell was Director of Fairchild Florida for decades.
He is 100% OCD extreme organic & won’t use power tools.
He has come out with many awesome mangoes including “Angie” named after the wife of the Director of (RFCI).
Richard has developed 3 new dwarf rootstock for mangoes.
Richard Campbell, his father, Gary & Walter Zill & their father had been close friends & work synergistic with each other, as well as Har who now works for Chris at Truly Tropical.
As to when & how he will market it, good question.
I can ask.
As to cold hardiness & disease resistance, Richard Campbell probably doesn’t even know yet.
My guess is that Richard will establish propagation agreements with those he knows & Trusts like Gary Zill who have large scale mango propagation already operational.
While Richard knows Har & Chris, they primarily sell lots of fruit & are small scale on cultivar grafting of trees for sale.

Mango seedling growth rates & grafts take longer than stone fruit.
Some of Richard’s dwarfs as double grafts.
The root stock is so different an intermediate species gets used between the root stock & the cultivar.
My estimate is 8 years before limited supply, because tissue culture of mango is almost as difficult as Asimina triloba.
Unless this interspecific is easily cloned?
Angie was released by Richard Campbell 12 years ago on one of his 3 proprietary dwarf root stocks.
So he already has a network connection established for mango cloning & grafting at least on 1 of his rootstock.
The interspecific hybrids will probably need the double graft transition he developed.
I will email Richard & ask him for more details.

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Email just sent to Richard Campbell:
Richard, congratulations on your accomplishments!
Do you have a time frame established for:
Introduction?
Propagation?
Distribution?
When & where will they be available?
What quantities?
Do you have an idea of cold hardiness?
Disease resistance?
Thanks

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“Mai Van Tri” tropical plant breeder & fruit grower extraordinaire of Vietnam & Ken Love Director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers Association were already aware of Richard Campbell’s new mangoes.
Ken Love actually traveled Florida last week to meet with Richard Campbell regarding the mangoes.
Many tropical fruits can’t be grown in Hawaii due to high Sulfur combined with low levels of some nutrients.
Plant diseases & chill hours also pose issues.
Ken Love is hopeful that these mangoes could be a new Hawaii crop!
He just spent a week negotiating with Richard.
Other than that he doesn’t want to go into details yet.
Still no response from Richard Campbell to my emails.

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Hi. Could I ask you to share information after receiving response on your email? I’m also interested in answers on these questions

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Most certainly, I will.
Richard, is however very busy.
As he is doing both a full time job for Champaign Mango,
plus harvest & tours at his home business MangoMen,
Plus his research, plus still facilitating transition at Fairchild, plus negotiations with Ken Love of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers.
Curious, are you Dr. Khalid Rauf ?

Thank you, I’ll wait.
I’m pushing growing zone here in zone 8b-9a, so the most interesting point for me is it’s cold hardiness.
No, I’m Rauf Aliyev, medical doctor :slightly_smiling_face:

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@Dr.Rauf
My environment fluctuates between (25°F & 117°F),
With about 10 days near 25°F & 114 days above 100°F.
So wild mango DNA combined with superior mango cultivars sounds very exciting to me.
The wild types also have much stronger aromatic (phenols & terpenoids) than most cultivars.
Combining high Brix with intense aromas, with improved environmental tolerance, is an awesome improvement to the agricultural potential of mangoes.
Especially with changing environmental conditions.
I will gladly get back to you with updates.
Richard Campbell has not yet returned my last email.
Probably very busy!

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Glad to hear, thanks a lot. Our weather is similar, we have mild winter, it’s cold, 40-50 degree mean day temperature, but rarely drops below friezing, just a couple of days 27-30 degree and once in 4-5 years 22-25 degree, thanks to global warming :slightly_smiling_face:
There were similar thread on tropicalfruitforum, roblack have access to wango seeds, I asked to share, but it seems he’s not going to do it :disappointed:

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If it also gets hot & you have alkaline soil, then perhaps the mango cultivar ‘Phoenix’ would be a good choice.
It is a very vigorous dense growth canopy tree with thicker branches.
Fruits are very intense & aromatic like Carrie, yet much firmer.
It’s a far better keeping mango too!
I’m planning on growing it here in the Sonoran Desert.

Yes, it’s exactly what iI have, very hot summer and alkaline sandy soil. I tried to graft one of my seedlings with Phoenix scions, but graft failed :disappointed: Too long way from USA to here, scions are hardly viable. But I did it because of flavor, not cold tolerance. Interesting. I’ve thought, Bailey’s Marvel is supposed to be the most cold tolerant variety, my this year’s graft succeeded :slightly_smiling_face:.

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@Dr.Rauf
Not USA?
I have friends in agriculture in many countries.
Maybe we can arrange Phoenix scions from a closer location.