What's happening today - 2018 edition


#1403

Ugh, my caville blanc d’hiver dropped all of its apples. So sad! Hate it when simple pleasures are so easily gone!


#1404

Since there are four of us we may just eat them all; theres not really enough for jam.

Re: Calville I have also found that I lose most of them. Its odd, the tree produces a million flowers but I get very few apples in the end. They also rot badly. This year I am planning on doing more summer sprays for the rot and if it doesn’t work out I may just topwork the tree.


#1405

Scott,
What do you use to spray for rot?


#1406

Does the Surround wash off easily?


#1407

No, its hard to get off of apricots and peaches. I occasionally use a brush to scrub it off but there is very little of it on the fruit since it was last sprayed over a month ago and I usually just eat it with the Surround still on. Its edible.

This year I mainly used Indar. I also bought some Elevate which is in a different resistance group and used that as well. I had a few rotted ones but not very many, less than 5%.


#1408

Thanks, Scott. I have a hard time figuring out different classes of fungicide and insecticide to avoid resistance.

Glad to know that Elevate is a diiferent class from Indar. I think Indar and Immunox are in the same class.

Label on Conserve SC said not to spray more than twice in a row. Then I have to switch to a different class for a time or two before switching back. Two sprays and switch. That’s a real pain!!!


#1409

A few pictures from the orchard today.


#1410

First JB showed up on the trap rosebush

Usually I get to cut a few of these in June


#1411

Picked some sweet cherry and CJ. Be honest,I still don’t care CJ that much。 It is flavorful, but tasted tart, plus small size.a lot of work to eat. If there is no other benefits of eating it, I would rather let birds have then and leave my sweet cherry alone
IMG_20180624_105251338


#1412

I have yet to find a satisfactory cherry pitter for smaller fruits


#1413

I am glad to hear that my black raspberries are supposed to be smaller than my red ones. I have never grown them before but I noticed the smaller size and was concerned. I can’t wait for them to ripen, they are loaded with blossoms.

ETA I have never grown them and harvested the fruit before.


#1414

what kind of black raspberries are you growing? the only one I’ve found cold hardy to z3 is the ohio treasures im growing now .


#1415

I am growing what was labeled as Wyoming Black. One was planted in 2016 and 3 in 2017. They grew, but not very large, and the fruit was eaten before I could get to it. (Grandkids LOL)

I did not mulch them for the winter so I thought they would be toast this spring but although most of the long canes died the rest of them are fine. Here are some pictures.


#1416

I’ve never heard of it. one tough plant to survive in your zone! saves you from having to prune them! :wink:


#1417

Dan, are you sure that Hollywood is by Luther Burbank? It’s not listed in “Luther Burbank’s Plant Contributions” (W. L. Howard, 1945), and it was introduced in 1936, ten years after Burbank’s death.


#1418

Me either! Have you ever seen one of these old hand crank ‘grinder’ type models?

https://www.lehmans.com/product/old-fashioned-cherry-pitter

They break up the cherries so they aren’t perfect looking, but I don’t think that is too important. After spending HOURS to pit a few gallons of sour cherries every year, I know I have to find a better method. Once my trees and bush cherries really start producing, I will be overwhelmed and fruit will go to waste.


#1419

I bought one - all it did was smash the fruit inside the hopper

Threw it out


#1420

@danchappell that is some insanely fast growth on that plum tree, it already has perfect shape from a tiny stick in 2 months, we couldn’t pull that off here in W MI.


#1421

Well that is disappointing!


#1422

Thanks for pointing that out Stan. I believe that I may be wrong about the origin of the Hollywood cultivar.

A brief internet search shows ambiguous information on it’s origin. One claim is that it was introduced in the 1930’s and then popularized by San Diego horticulturalist Sin Jin. A Czech site claims that it originated in Great Britain in the 1950’s.