What's up with this apple?

This is a look I have never seen. I assume it’s from some sort of bug but imagine someone here has the answer.

I’m referring to the dark spots on the skin and in the flesh.

ive seen that in wild fruit apples but never see a worm or bug. curious what others say.

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Maybe bitter pit

Apple (Malus spp.)-Bitter Pit | Pacific Northwest Pest Management Handbooks (pnwhandbooks.org)

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Looks like bitter pit.

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I’ve seen that on apples, but didn’t know what it was. Thanks for the info.

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Wow, I think you guys nailed it.! Thank you.
Hot, dry, irregular watering. Pretty much sums up the trees life! And the spots appeared after storage. I guess I need to eat the other one I picked just the other day before this happens to it too.
This was off of a young Ashmead’s, first fruits produced.

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If it’s not Apple fly maggot then it’s something very similar. The tiny bored holes seem to fit. Often the degree of infection increases over time

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Apple maggot. I lost whole crop this year to it. (that is what inside it, outside spots are different)

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I would have said apple maggot except for those spots on the skin

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If you are not certain you can check with your county extension agent who can most likely confirm. If it’s apple maggot fly then the best treatment is to spray your crop early in spring when fruit is size of a quarter with Surround (Kayolin Clay). Meanwhile you need to assure all infested apples are not allowed to lay around over winter, thus allowing the grubs to overwinter under your tree. Spoiling apples must be disposed of off site, do not try to compost, unless you can create enough heat to kill the grubs. Since I started using Surround my apples have not be affected. The initial spray application I do 3 times with time between each interval to allow the clay layer to dry. Then you need to spray weekly or immediately after each significant rain, until apples are mature. This program controls maggot fly and coddling moth.
Dennis
Kent. Wa

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My county extension agent is AOL. I have never had any luck with them calling me back after trying to contacting them.

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Go visit the extension office and push. Their job is to serve you. Do not let them get away with ignoring you.

Looks very much like bitter pit and you take care of that with a calcium foliage spray for each cover spray (with fungicides and pesticides) - (8-10 times per year after petal fall - I use 16 oz per 100 gallons and it is cheap - also use Boron at the same time) and depending on the apple cultivar (e.g., Honeycrisp) by using less potassium and phosphorus when fertilizing. It is important to get your soil tested - for example, in VA and WVA there is virtually no Boron in the dirt. Keep it in mind that growing fruit is hard!

The extension agency is about 45 minutes away from me. I tried to find someone in the office about half a dozen times. Going there is a chore. You call and all you get is an answering machine that says " if you are not answering the phone we are either helping someone here in the office, one the phone, or out in the field. Leave a message and we will contact you when we get the chance." When I went there there was a sign on the door, " Due to Covid we have restricted hours and limited employees. Call our office for more information".
I’ve even left messages at the main state office. " we will pass the message on to someone that will call you back". I just give up.