Would this work for creating new fruit trees?

https://www.walmart.com/ip/10-Pack-Plant-Rooting-Device-Reusable-Plant-Root-Growing-Box-Assisted-Cutting-Rooting-Ball-for-Fast-Propagation-Plants-Asexual-Reproduction-Small/415932361

I’m curious whether you think this would work for peach or apple trees?

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For sure air layering will work.
But I am not a fan of varieties in their own roots, more easy and fast to graft it.

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I’ve never grafted and am hesitant to start

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Trust me, if I can do it you can do it! Start with apples, make a few boo-boos, ask a lot of questions here, and you’ll get it.

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If you are dead set on air layering, you don’t need to buy those plastic things. I use this technique and materials for magnolias. A video for any plant.

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If those Walmart plastic pieces don’t seal tight the rooting medium will dry out.

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Grafting isnt nearly as esoteric as its made out to be. Its easy to get started and is great fun to fool around with. Air layering os great too but its a lot of work and the success rate isnt always great.

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What @hobilus said. I’ll add that if you air layer it will be years before the tree is old enough to bear fruit and it will likely grow into a pretty large tree. If you graft you might see a few fruit in just a couple of years.

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I’m in Italy and don’t have access to scions so I would just be cutting my own trees and putting it on other trees. I wouldn’t gain any new fruit

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I would bet they would give you scions, Hugh.

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yeah, getting scions is half the fun too. You can swap em like baseball cars, collect them on walks, etc. and then make $100 trees all day for pennies. Whats not to like? If you think youre going to fail, you definitely will, at least some. We all do. But dont be intimidated by it, it’s something a 10 yr old kid can learn and become adept at. Start with apples. Theyre SOOOOO forgiving

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Avocados are also a good one to start with! The wood is easy to cut and I usually have pretty good take rates even when the cambium isn’t perfectly aligned. 9a in Italy would be a good place for an avocado trial.

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The sooner the better,
you may never regret it.
Be carefull it’s adictive,
they’re are always scion sources like neighbours,groups of exchange like fruitiers.org …and so on, wood sources it’s not a problem,
first you will start with a few varieties, then start to increase drastically …step by step you will progress.

it’s more a topic to will to do it, set targets and all will come! Good luck!!

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I’ve used them successfully for smoke tree, forsythia, Japanese Willow, winter Jasmine and other trees and bushes that are relatively easy to root from cuttings. It’s important not to let them dry out, and the composition of the media that worked best for me was a mixture of dirt and moss.

The root ball that forms is pretty amazing.

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I tried them last year, got no takes. They dried out too fast and too often for me. This year, I’m going to try the old method of wrapping damp peat moss with saran wrap and foil.

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I’ve bought the exact same thing from Amazon and they work like a champ on fig trees and muscadine vines, both of which are grown on their own roots. Most apple trees are grafted onto a different rootstock for a reason. Not sure about peach trees. I had been using plastic bottles for air layering and these are much more convenient.

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I have near 100% success with air layering. I’ve tried grafting pawpaws, hardy kiwis, and Asian and domestic persimmons. Not a single one of the grafts has been successful. I started with the gismo that has different blades and can cut the scions and rootstocks with the W shape or V shape, found out it supposedly crushes the wood, bought a grafting knife, rubber bands, grafting tape, etc. None of it has worked. Don’t tell me it’s easier than air layering. Edited to add: Air layering isn’t useful on plants that need a different rootstock. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be wasting my time trying to graft.

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Thatd be a great one to air layer, especially since it suckers. From a nurseryman perspective, having clonal cultivars on their own roots would be dynamite.

Air layering is more of a paint by numbers technique, so I can see that for some people it might be less of a hurdle technique wise. Still, I graft in a few minutes- realistically more like an hr for me since I often do multiple grafts per tree, plus getting setup, etc. Ive had grafts push 8 ft. of growth in a season and bear a decent crop the following year. The air layers Ive done have taken that long, plus upkeep through the season (I used “rootpots” which required adding water ~ weekly) and then of the ones that took (say 50% or less) I had to nurse them along in containers or nurse beds for a couple of years before setting out.

Whats your preferred method for air layering @garymc ? Do you use old timey foil or cellophane, or one of the special purpose built products? My conclusion from using the special pots I purchased is that cellophane may be easier and superior in most ways, though Ive honestly yet to try.

@Exmil … i got talked into trying grafting… spring 2022.

1 mulberry graft… had great success… got lots of nice fruit from it last year.

Spring 2023… i added 7 varieties of persimmons, 3 varieties of apples, 1 variety of goumi, 1 variety of cherry… thru grafting.

Spring 2024… i have traded for scions so that i can graft 5 more varieties of persimmon, 6 more varieties of apple 5 more varieties of plum, 1 more variety of pear.

It is addictive and a great way to increase your number of fruit trees or just add other varieties to existing trees.

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Has anyone mentioned the other benefit of grafting, that a rooted piece all too often acts like a seedling, taking X number of years to bloom & set initial fruit? A graft ofttimes will begin producing in half the time.

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