Arborvitae Dilema


#21

The Creeping Charlie is in my trees at home, not among the arborvitaes.

I’ve heard that Hostas are candy for deer. I planted a couple at another site and they were eaten within 2 days.


#22

Your right, I’d still cut the arbs
I have the Creep in my trees too. When I get tired of it, Roundup.


#23

Thanks, Antmary.

Ortho lists CC as one of its target weeds. Bayer does not.

I looked up chickweed. It has white flowers, must be a cousin to CC.

Bob- my aplogy for hijacking your thread.


#24

Bob, if it is a sunny place you may think about Russian sage. It looks somewhat like lavender, and should be very deer resistant, spreads fast. Not very ornamental in winter. I do not know if boxwood is deer resistant, but it would cover the lower arbovitae well and it is green all seasons. But it grows slowly.


#25

If you mix your own round-up you can control the strength. ( I tried regular round up on it and it browned but never died. I have too much of it hand dig.) Leave the mixture stronger (less water) but you will kill anything else green in its path. I just couldn’t do that. The is growing to close to many of my trees. Ugh! I have hand dug tons of it out around my trees and then mulched. That slowed down the process of growth.


#26

My wife and I made creeping charlie tea last year- very good as it is in the mint family. We both thought it seemed to give a pretty good buzz- you feel really really good for about 10-15 minutes. I don’t know the science behind it, but when it gets a little warmer we’ll be making it again.


#27

This is just one more opinion. At this stage no matter what caused the issue I don’t think you will get enough new limbs that low to get a good balance and look good again. Many varieties of plants tend to focus there energy on the top portion and I suspect this one is that way. I’m certainly not an expert on this but I have had a long time interest in my home landscaping. On most evergreen plants used in the landscape it is suggested to always keep the base limbs/foliage a little wider than the upper portion to help with this issue. The shade from the fence might be contributing to the under-story decline. The upper section looks healthy and if it is used to provide privacy I would trim the lower limbs back and as others suggested plant new plants under these. Most Holly bushes are shade tolerant in my area and work well for this purpose. A great tree that is often used in my area for privacy is the Nellie R Stevens holly. I planted a row about seven years ago and have no regrets. What grows well in my area might be a complete flop for you. Bill


#28

ok, did anyone else try this? How much does one have to use?

I have dug out more creeping charlie in my life than I care to even think about. Between this and bindweed, these are 85% of my weeds…

The rest are pretty desirable plants (catnip, purslane, currant bushes, cherry tomatoes and chives)

Scott


#29

There are several very different plants often called “creeping charlie”

Best to get a true ID before attacking


#30

My second lawn is almost now all creeping Charlie. I give up!!!


#31

We chopped up the leaves and flowers and put in as many as the “tea ball” would hold and let it steep covered for about 10 minutes.


#32

I have it everywhere. I’ve also given up. I just mow it. The flowers are kind of pretty…