Zone pushers

Thankyou. Now I Know. Not a very good method for zone setting. I always chose trees that whet 1 zone colder for all, but my citrus trees. The citrus come inside or are in heated greenhouses

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I’ll try anything once. Don’t work? Try something different. 50 years later, you finally got something you can work with. How about 75 or more container growing citrus and figs and what not.

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Inground? Just throw a dice. Polar Vortex? Less trees to deal with! Why worry. Got other hobbies to deal with.

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I definitely prefer the Köppen climate classification system, but the USDA growing zone system has simplicity on its side:

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Solar minimum or operation solar shield?

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I love zone pushing. I have rock and gravel soil, every time one of them tree dies it means I already have a tree planting place in the bank. It honestly feel like cheating.

To me zone pushing means something else altogether. We get a meltdown in January, it can be an entire week in the 50’s followed next week by sub zero temperatures. I’m in zone 4, but that shit can kill a zone 2 tree if it gets fooled into walking up early.

Then there is the mega short season; I consider not seeing overnight freezing before the first week of October a looong season. Any tree that doesn’t ripen fruit before then may be hardy, but it may never ripen fruit on time. I have some apples, some grapes, and all my hops in that category.

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On the internet you can find anything…you still have to sort and decide … since so many
contradict others. The majority isn’t right many times. You have to kiss a lot of frogs to find a prince of ‘truth’ .

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Hey can we stick to zone pushing and stay out of politics here? I’m getting tired how fruit topics are turning into politics with the same people leading the way every time it seems.

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So far I’m finding that trees of avocado, white sapote, cherimoya, jaboticaba, and longan are very achievable in my yard. I’m hoping that their flowers and fruit are just as hardy.
I’m trying a few other annonas. Maybe “zone pulling” pawpaws to 9b. As well as pushing atemoya, cherilata, and custard apple. Pawpaws seem fine. The cherilata is going strong! The Geffner atemoya struggled in a heat wave and maybe wasn’t as fit as others coming in to the winter but it is doing fine but is showing some stress. The custard apples are tiny seedlings that won’t survive if I don’t intervene. The last of them is beginning to succumb to ongoing cold.
I have some small Garcinias, they’re all looking good but the Achacha has dropped leaves so I moved that to a slightly more sheltered location.
I also have some seedlings of Canistel and Abiu and am hoping to try some other Pouteria species.
Unfortunately, I’m currently in a mind space where even the failures suggest to me that with more care while young, an older tree might survive these conditions…
And what if I could grow mangoes!

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Please don’t bring up Christy. He is a political shill and that is all.

Can we please not close another thread because people can’t keep their conspiracy theories and religion and political agendas to themselves? That is all.

This is why the government has to keep making more laws, because people can’t save themselves from themselves. Let’s not make it the mods job to make more rules to do the same…

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I believe people have tried and failed on the pawpaws in climates that are too warm all year long. I guess if you REALLY wanted them to thrive, you could find a walk in freezer to get chill units… That seems very excessive when so many other wonderful things can be grown in California that can’t be easily in the colder areas!

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Plenty of cold here! I’ve already had fruit. Shouldn’t be any problem :slightly_smiling_face:

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I like zone pushing a bit but given my limited yard space, I devote 90% of it to proven winners. Still, I am growing Moringa, Michelia alba, Curry leaf, Cherimoya and some guavas. Passion fruit (P. Edulis) and White sapote are bullet-proof here, so I don’t consider them “zone-pushed”. Its too early to say this (as one hard freeze can wipe out all of them), but all of these are easier to grow than any kiwi so far :slight_smile:

There are so many people growing Pawpaws in and around Bay Area. I think @Marta is growing pawpaws even in Central Valley. Unless these trees are struggling after getting established (which would surprise me), I don’t think its a concern. Also, if you like custard apples a lot and they turn out to be cold sensitive to your winters, I think they are graft compatible with Cherimoyas. It might be worth trying them on Cherimoya/Atemoya roots, particularly an established one. Not to guide you down a wrong path, but its not too surprising anymore to see a mango tree in SCV. I am sure there must 100 failures for every success but its not just that one lone surviving tree in Santa Clara thats featured in many YouTube videos anymore!

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Yes, they seem to be doable here in the Sacramento Valley but they require shade when young.

Yay, we are off of the politics tangent. Some political posts got flagged and are hidden. If you want to read them go ahead, just click to view the ignored content.

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Something I learned the hard way over years.

Reliable cropping beats all, or almost all.

You can save the experimentation until after you are at a point where you get a couple of bushels of whatever almost every single year.

The reality is that almost any variety commonly circulated is going to be at least 8.5 out of 10.0 if well-grown and eaten promptly. So what if you can buy ‘Ginger Gold’ apples at Whole Foods? It still won’t be as good as yours.

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My pawpaws are growing well. Several named varieties have next years flower buds forming, hopefully I’ll get a few of these to try. I’ve only had seedling pawpaw and a shipment of named varieties (for which I’m very grateful!) that arrived fairly bruised and browned. That was sent by a friend, not by someone on this forum.

I’ve never had a custard apple! I just get fired up and enthusiastic about these things. People tell me cherimoyas will be the best annonas I can grow and that’s probably true. But you never know. I don’t really want to have to fuss over stuff that’s not very hardy to my yard. But I had planned to graft it to a cherimoya to get a taste sooner. And I’m trying to grow ilama as well. Failures are not just current but looming as well.

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Oh! And I’m glad to hear further encouragement for mangos! So far I’m keeping it low pressure with polyembryonic seeds and seedlings. Limited investment but relatively unlimited hope

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Sorry for the trouble my post caused. I think leaving it so those that desire to read the censored items may do so is great. It should reduce some of the glee those on the ‘left’ of contentious issues get in trying to cancel those from the ‘right’.

I can sense it causes extra trouble and I’ll try harder to be a-political.
But it’s hard to be quiet if somebody says climate change is going to flood Florida –
my response that that’s not true is considered politics and gets flagged.
It is noticed and appreciated that you try to be neutral in a time that’s rare.
:+1:

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