2024 summer grafting thread

I haven’t, but I would imagine persimmon would do well grafting that time of year. I’ve only ever chip budded citrus and fig. I think I have a tiny bit of coffee cake left in the fridge I could try a chip bud or two just to see how they do (on the w/t trunk of coffee cake that took)

I vote option A for more possible points of contact. But I’ve never bark grafted anything

1 Like

Well, I have one each of t and chip bud going now. I’ll report back to you later.

Never had much luck with t cuts. Just carve a bud out looking like an upsidedown U and match on the rootstock.

After 2-3 weeks should look like this.

3 Likes

I might actually do the blue lines and then maybe let some resprouts grow for a bit to graft in this winter too. Just my two cents.

1 Like

I believe that generally people recommend summer budding rather than late winter grafting for cherries in the PNW, but my budding failures are why I’m considering other summer grafts.

1 Like

I think I would leave a nurse branch in tact. Maybe that small diameter one. Then proceed with option A. Wedge graft 3 or 4 scions per branch, in late winter/early spring.

There’s your option C :slight_smile:

2 Likes

Just got some Peluche scions to add to my loquat tree. Gonna take the top off and change the top of the tree to peluche. However it will still be cleft grafts because it’s not large enough up there to do a bark graft I think.

2 Likes


Peluche added :slight_smile:

Also grafted some Illinois ever bearing mulberry all clefts

4 Likes


Argelino pushing growth

Kando

Avri

4 Likes

I have some scion now to try chip budding and summer grafting. I’ve got a winter banana that’s in shade, and a chestnut crab that’s not. I’ll try the foil on some and white clay on others; might try bark graft, chip budding, and a few standard whip/tongue wrapped against the heat, and see what takes.

these are apple, what will improve my chances this late in season? I’ll hold one or two back to try fall graft if that’s a possibility

1 Like

I’ve only grafted apple in spring but they seem to take grafts really easily. I don’t see why a cleft or w/t wouldn’t work right now. Maybe others could advise differently, but like you said if you keep some to save for possible fall grafts why not try them.

2 Likes

Grafting in the fall isn’t really a good idea unless your in such a warm zone that you rarely see freezing temperatures. The wood needs time to harden off before going dormant and the freezing weather sets in.

I had a chip bud of shiro plum break in late August last summer. I thought for sure it had died the January cold spell we had. It did come back, but it’s still looking pretty sad for the amount of growing time it’s had.

2 Likes

I’ll hop to it these next few days in that case

1 Like

Again feijoa being totally random. :roll_eyes: I tried Marta"s summer sale and the Marta’s Lickvers pride veneer graft is pushing, but my spring ones had 2 out of 6 take!

7 Likes

I’ve done apple chip budding end of May. Never tried laye summer for apple. But I have successfully done nectarine, peach, and Italian plum all in Aug/Sept. With beautiful results the next year.

2 Likes

Love the picture. Looks just like my pots with random oregano and mint (spearmint?) sticking out of pots.

2 Likes

I actually sow herbs or leave small weeds in my seedling/cutting/grafting pots to monitor the moisture better. And often leave the fragrant stuff to confuse pests.

5 Likes

Wish I had planned it, but the Mint and Oregano have spread out of their pots in my propagation area. At least the Mojitos are good nowadays!

4 Likes

@Gkight

The weather is punishing so i think i will graft to make a point this weekend

As long as their is moisture grafts can be succesful. 100 degree F + grafting is definately considered a nono.

3 Likes