Anyone here growing salmonberries?

hey folks! i noticed rolling river nurses has salmonberry plants. anyone grow these? if so , how do they taste? I’ve read they’re fairly bland. i usually like berries that are on the tart side so i may not like this one. just planted some thimbleberries from hartmanns. already putting out new growth! any info is appreciated. happy growing!

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In Alaska, I’ve observed orange colored salmonberry growing wild along both sides of the Cook Inlet, the inlets and river valleys that feed into it – including the Eagle River valley far upstream from Anchorage. Although the region is rated USDA zone 2b the winters here are moderate in comparison to the northern U.S. mid-west; e.g. Chicago. I have tasted them in these locations. My older daughter lives in Homer AK and salmonberry is growing nearby her home. When ripe they are delicious, with a flavor somewhere between raspberry and boysenberry.

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I don’t grow them,but they are fairly common along the roads in Washington.That is about the only time I eat them,if walking and coming upon a patch.The best flavored ones to me are scarlet colored,compared to the orange berries Brady

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I’ve never seen scarlet colored ones. :sunglasses:

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thanks for the replies! i guess ill have to buy one! :wink:

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There are salmonberries here in the Pacific Northwest that have a distinctive red tint on the druplet surface, but most are plain orange. I have tasted many and they are pleasant for a thirsty hiker, but have not had nearly the flavor of any cultivated caneberry.

The most salmonberries I have ever seen at one time was in the movie “Salmonberries” (1991)-- canned in quart jars.

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They grow wild on my property and adjacent. I think they are my least favorite aggregate berry that I’ve tried. Bland and bitter.

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So it turns out there are three different Rubus species with the common name “salmonberry” – and likely we’re all referring to different entities. Check out the native ranges in these links, along with information about “Gene source for …” etc.

Rubus chamaemorus

Rubus parviflorus

Rubus spectabilis

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Rubus spectabilis is the one I was referring to above.
Rubus parviflorus is what I call Thimbleberry and is also common in the PNW.The taste is a little bitter,plus there is not much flesh and that can be soft and mushy when ripe.
Rubus chamaemorus,Cloudberry,I’ve never seen or heard of. Brady

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There are many other fruiting Rubus plants too. An interesting genus.

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i have the arctic raspberry and thimbleberry that i planted this spring. cloudberry is very difficult to cultivate as it grows in acidic boggy areas high in organic matter . supposedly they occur in maine but I’ve never come across them. we have the dwarf raspberry here also. grows almost like a dewberry creeping across the ground by rhizomes but they put out very few fruit.

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i agree! my family foraged for fruit and berries when i was young. it was a all day affair. we were poor so we relied on these resources. wild raspberries were my favorite despite the numerous yellow jacket nests we ran into. nothing like a wild raspberry pie or jam! I’m amazed by all the Rubus genus types just in n. america. the cultivated varieties are my biggest producers but the wild ones have a lot more flavor.

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I grow a lot of berries too, I still forage for wild raspberries, but I’m happy with the cultivated ones too. I’m playing around crossing them, and a new hybrid is going to fruit this year. Forming fruit now. A cross between Polka and Anne. I’m looking for off color variants to give a rainbow of colors at harvest. I like the yellow raspberries, some do not, but I think Fall Gold has a very unique taste. I would add even more cultivars if I had room. I grow Fall Gold, Double Gold, Anne, Cascade Gold, Kiwi Gold, and Honey Queen. I’m also experimenting with blackberries. I really like Tayberries a raspberry-blackberry cross. It has the most raspberry flavor of any of the hybrids (Boysen, loganberry etc) Logan is good too, but hard to grow here. I may try again in the future. So I’m using tayberry pollen in an attempt to bring this flavor to more hardy blackberries like Darrow. I’m still waiting for my Darrow plant to mature, so this year I just concentrated on taste and crossed tayberry with Lochness, New Berry, and Columbia Star. They might not take because of ploidy level incompatibilities. They are bagged, we will see. I need practice with growing blackberries from seed anyway before I do other crosses, so this is more an experiment than anything. They need to be scarified, and this is a tough process to get right.

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i planted some anne this spring but probably won’t get much fruit as our 1st frosts are mid. sept. I’m curious to see how your hybrid does. i planted 4 baby cakes dwarf blackberries that fruit on primo and floro canes. they only get 3ft. tall so should be protected by our deep snow in winter. i also planted some darrow blackberries but I’m sure most years the canes will winter kill to the snow line but should get some berries. if your polka/anne crosses work out id be willing to buy or trade some plants with you to give a try of them up here. should be earlier producing and more winter hardy than the anne alone. what growing zone are you? I’m 3b/4a .good luck!

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not an indorsement but I bought Salmonberry Seeds. British Columbia so I supposed they are Rubus spectabilis.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/381754669143?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Hybrid Vancover Tayberry

http://www.ebay.com/itm/381754670302?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

and Rubus Leucodermis Western Black Raspberry, the orginal blue raspberry flavor.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/122216029498?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

With any luck I will have plants to share but my luck is not all that good.

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In the Alaskan​ regions of Kenai peninsula, Anchorage, etc. the wild salmonberries ripen around the 1st of July.

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Yes, spectabilis is the one I was referring to also. Most people seem to like thimble berries, they are much more flavorful, but they melt in your mouth like cotton candy - very insubstantial.

I don’t think I’ve had cloudberry.

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If you get some good thornless crosses, please share.

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Sure you bet! Columbia Star is interesting as it has a 3rd thornless gene. No other cultivars use it. And OSU says it’s OK to use in breeding, just give credit. It may be dominant too? The others are not and can require back crossing to get the thornless genes to express itself.
Last year a bird deposited thornless grew in one of my containers, but it died during the winter.

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i would be very interested too. not for the thornless but for the more cold hardiness and earlier fruiting. anne just has to start fruiting up here and the sept frost kills them! polka i have in my garden and fruits 2-3 weeks earlier than anne, which would work much better for me in zone 3b… id buy a couple or trade for my other berries.

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