Beer and Tea Garden


#41

I grew so Bee balm and need to grow it again. It has a pleasant turpentine flavor. I have Hyssop also but I never heard of anise Hyssop I will have to check it out.


#42

Anise hyssop is agastache and is a crazy good nectar producer. Also smells amazing and makes a great tea nice and drought tolerant and pretty spike blossoms.

Raspberry leaf helps ladies with cramps and hormone regulation (including menopause, pregnancy and pms)


#43

Hops root is often sold in four inch segments. NO worries.


#44

my Tea and Salal really grew well this fall and mild winter. I think there was more growth then during the summer infact.
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#45

Nice! If you don’t mind sharing, how did you start the Rosa rugosa? And can you make any suggestion for germinating their seeds? Been considering but it seems some people say they’re difficult to start from seed


#46

I did not start seeds. I bought starter plants from Raintree. Some Reds, whites and pink scabrosa, Frau Dagmar. All where reported to have flavorful hips. I will be happy to send you seeds this fall if want to try to start them.


#47

:+1::grin: Have you tried Roselle? It may be zone pushing but it’s very ornamental and has many uses.


#48

I love it. but I have not tried to grow it. I always plan to start seeds early and put them out but never get around to it. My wifes family grows it and sells there surplus.


#49

Roselle grows well as an annual. I grew it for a few years in Kansas. I’ll probably try it here in NH as well, but I think it needs short days to bloom, so it may be iffy.


#50

Yes I grew it last year, didn’t start blooming until maybe late September/October and ground to a halt at the first light freeze.
Pretty while it is going though. Prolific seeder. I’m planning to grow a lot more this year.


#51

I grew this variety, which is less daylight sensitive:
https://southernexposure.com/products/roselle-thai-red/
They say midsummer in Virginia, but I think it was more like July or August for me in Kansas.


#52

Thanks,
I may get some of those too.


#53

Reports of successes growing Camellia sinensis in Pennsylvania, and my own successes growing C. japonica motivated me to try growing tea plants this year. I ordered 2 Korean varieties and will get a Sochi tea plant locally. They came in the mail today. C. sinensis is easily propagated via cuttings so I’ll make backups in case they fail during a bad winter.


#54

blushing maiden has nice pink blossoms but is not strong grower for me.


#55

This is in containers right? Or are they in the ground? I would love to try growing Camellia sinensis outdoors if it can survive 5b winters.


#56

5B is pushing. In Zone 7 NJ, Winter unprotected 2018 there was major damage from wind and cold but all survived. 2019 winter was very mild and I had lots of growth. Wind protection I think is most important.


#57

C. japonica grows fine in the ground in my part of Pennsylvania. There is a member on here who grows C. sinensis for several years in the ground and has very large bushes in a neighboring county. I’d say he’s probably in 6b.


#58

What is the lowest temp for your winters?


#59

Sometimes we go down to -3 or -4 degrees for a night or 2. A lot of winters stay above zero though. We are considered right at the border of 6b and 7a.


#60

Interesting… It’s similar temperatures due to the lake effect though we have had -15 to -20 on a rare night. I wonder if Sochi has any particular flavor profile.