Citrus tolerant of 0 degrees

Many of us live in colder climates but would love to grow citrus. Mexico, Florida, and California are suffering from greening disease so citrus is becoming harder to get in the midwest as prices go up. Lets focus this category on citrus that can handle 0 degrees. Here are a couple of reportedly hardy trees.

Yuzu Ichandrin Hardy Citrus Tree

Sudachi Hybrid Yuzu

If you suspect breeding is being done with trifoliata oranges your correct. Here is a link to onegreenworld that offers citrus to those in zone 7. Hardy Citrus Tree Bundle available at One Green World Nursery

Believe i posted this video recently for the zone pushers

If 0 degrees is not cold hard enough for your location try poncirus trifoliata oranges. The fruit quality is poor but it can be used as a source of citrus in zones as cold as mine.

PLANT SPOTLIGHT: Trifoliate Orange – Philadelphia Orchard Project.

2 Likes

Zero degrees F or C? Yuzu and Sudachi get damaged well above zero degrees Fahrenheit.

7 Likes

@JohannsGarden

O degrees F reportedly are something the adult trees can handle but not for prolonged periods.

1 Like

My Yuzu have been in ground for a few years in zone 8a. They usually get at least a little winter damage each year. I can’t imagine them surviving anywhere close to zero F. I’ve seen a Sudachi die in half a zone warmer (8b). My trifoliate hybrids all come through with less damage.

5 Likes

@JohannsGarden

They are claiming zone 7 but i believe you know better based on experience. Satsuma and others can reportedly handle 15 degrees.

Their descriptions says “Should be hardy to at least 10° F.” That’s quite unrealistic. They might survive a brief encounter with severe cold, but not dying fully and being hardy are two different things. The ‘Flying Dragon’ of course is more hardy.

2 Likes

@JohannsGarden

Do you grow the artic frost satsuma? It is reportedly hardy to 9F. Take a look at that video it says yuzu is hardy to 0F as well. The only citrus i can grow outside is trifoliata. If i can get better citrus trees hardy from 0-20F i think that is very possible in a greenhouse.

1 Like

No, but I’ve got a ‘Changsha’ mandarin in a large pot that’s doing very well. I haven’t fully tested the 'Changsha’s hardiness yet, but it’s supposed to be one of the hardier ones.

1 Like

Figs aren’t hardy here on the border of zone 7-8. Citrus with decent fruit won’t be either. Planting them would be a total waste of money.

Zone 7-8 on the plains is harder on figs than zone 7-8 on the Eastern seaboard. Out east the temperature swings are much less and they have more cloud cover.

3 Likes

@fruitnut

This is good i posted this before i bought them for a greenhouse or hot room. Many nurseries state zone 7 but really should be saying zone 7b or 8. I want to grow them with little or no extra heat.

It seems easy enough to find sellers willing to vouch for yuzu’s hardiness in climates colder than what they actually have experience growing it in…

5 Likes

The trifoliata lived outside here for 3 years and we dipped to -15F. It is reportedly hardy to -10F.

1 Like

My ‘Morton’ citranges and ‘Dunston’ citrumelos have overwintered in ground without protection pretty well the last few years.

2 Likes

Yuzu can’t compare to Citrus trifoliata in terms of hardines…

1 Like

@JohannsGarden

Think the crosses will get there eventually Oranges in Zone 5 . Here was one of my trifoliata when dormant . Grew it beside my pond in a semi protected location so i was zone stretching.

1 Like

I agree. The hybridizing work needs to be done. I would be helping if I could only get more of my Citrus to actually start flowering! I believe people need to stop expecting to get sweet hybrids by crossing non-hardy varieties of nice sweet/sour balance with the hardy trifoliates and switch to crossing the trifoliates with bland low acid citrus. That’s why I got the ‘Changsha’ since it has a reputation for being sweet, but bland from low acid. Same with ‘Bloomsweet’ grapefruit. Both the ‘Changsha’ and ‘Bloomsweet’ are on the more hardy side for “non-hardy” Citrus and hopefully would produce some very hardy and nearly flavor balanced offspring if crossed with the trifoliates.

3 Likes

I’m reminded of something I read about canary breeding years ago. Breeders don’t get the best birds from crossing two that have traits they want the offspring to have. Instead they pick two parents with extreme traits on both sides of what they want to produce. You cross left and right to produce center so to speak. I have yet to hear of any trifoliate hybrids being made with this strategy.

3 Likes

@fruitnut

What do you think of these zone 8 citrus are they legitimately hardy in zone 8 outside? Eg. CHANGSA

https://www.mortellaros.com/plant/Citrus-reticulata-Changsha

https://www.plantanswers.com/changsha.htm

There are many sources for them

The Thomasville Citrangequat is reportedly hardy to 5F

This is another group of cold hardy citrus but there is some overlap

2 Likes

Have they fruited for you? Have you tasted the fruit?

1 Like

Given how well my ‘Changsha’ has done with minor protection in zone 8a (unheated greenhouse with window open all winter), I think it might be fine outdoors in zone 8 most years. I’ve been contemplating putting it in ground.

2 Likes