Forest fires and potash


#1

We had big fires in 2000 (for just one example) and there was a layer of ash everywhere. I later read that orchards in the area were able to save money on fertilizer because they were able to apply less potassium.

So there is that silver lining. But just look at this map to get an idea of the impact of these fires!

https://fire.airnow.gov/

Right now our visibility is probably a couple of miles, so we’ve seen worse. But the mountains are pretty well obscured and we’ve curtailed our regular morning walk to avoid the smoke. We have family in the Bay area and in W. Oregon, so we’re worried about them. Nasty business.


#2

I burned some of my land off. Wild raspberry, blackberry, sticker bushes, weeds, and grass quickly moved in. They sure did love the ash judging by their invasion.


#3

Antidotal, yes. But man my lawn is growing like it’s on steroids, and we have been snowing ash for days here in the Bay Area. I don’t believe it’s a coincidence.


#4

Our sunsets the past week in KENTUCKY have been magnificent!

Thanks, california.


#5

They’re about to get a lot better!
We’ve had a stagnant wind pattern for the better part of a week. But, now there’s a low pressure moving onshore overnight finally pushing the bulk of the smoke to the East.


#6

Grab a couple images from today…one from my area and one from the fire north of Los Angeles. Would appear wind direction and probably the Sierra Nevada were helping the smoke stay out of the deserts of Nevada (clear day in Vegas).

red X is about where i am… that was over us most of the late afternoon…very very hazy. Chicago is in the lower right (clear there).

Here is the big fire north of Los Angeles…