Fruits protection


#1

I’m keep trying to find ways to protect my fruitlets. This year I am using purple nitrile gloves to protect them. I will insert the baby fruit into the glove finger and tie it with a fishing string. I will update the result this Fall.

Tony


#2

I have seen several methods on covering fruit but this is the first for this method. Looking forward to updates on how well the glove fingers work.


#3

Tony,
Is it breathe-able? Fruit could rot if not ventilation at all.


#4

I will make a small vertical cut at the tip of the glove to let some air in.

Tony


#5

Pin pricks would work for ventilation too.


#6

This year I’m experimenting with these Organza Bags.


#7

What fruits need protection and which don’t?

I’m wondering if pawpaws or persimmons ever need protection?

I know apples, peaches, apricots, & plums do.

Anything else need protection & anything else not?

What to use best for grapes?

Dax


#8

No need to protect persimmon or paw paw fruits from pests. The raccoons like to steal my pawpaws, grapes, and the birds go after my ripened persimmons and gooseberries if there are no other foods source available. I don’t protect my apricots because they are way too early for pests to get them except for late frost. The ants and Japanese beetles loved to go after my honey jar jujubes due to the high sugar contents.

Tony


#9

Tony,

“I don’t protect my apricots because they are way too early for pests to get them except for late frost.”

If I ever get my apricots to set fruit (my 3rd year waiting and hope that late freeze will not wipe them out again), I can bet you that OFM and PC will find my apricots no matter how early they set fruit.

You are lucky.


#10

For grapes I use netting.:blush:


#11

You are the grape lady… I remember that! Swenson Red is one you really like! :blush:

Thank you Mrs. G.

Dax


#12

I know a lot of “figgers” use the organza bags, with mixed results. Definitely seems to help with insects getting to the fruit, but not always with the birds and critters.


#13

I tried organza bags last year. This ended in complete failure. Coddling moth was able to infect the fruit through the holes in the bags. If the bag touches the fruit in any way it can be ruined. It is almost impossible for the bag not to touch the fruit with any wind.


#14

For organza bags, you need to spray Surround on top of the organza bags. I found it was helpful as Surrounds mostly stick to the bags not the fruit, making the fruit look better and making it easier to clean Surround off the fruit.

For peaches, paper bags like Clemson bags works very well. These bags are too big for plums and too much work for plums as plums set fruit like crazy.


#15

Mamuang,

What are your thoughts about diluted white latex paint and paint the pea size fruitlets for pests protection. The paint will wash away easy with water down the road?

Tony


#16

Don’t think so, Tony. I painted tree trunks with diluted latex two years ago. The paint is still quite visible. It was 50/50. You would need very diluted paint. Surround spray will be better, faster and more effective IMHO.


#17

I would also go with surround. I’m not crazy about the ghostly looking fruit tree but it sure helps with keeping down pest damage.


#18

I wonder if the taste (and smell) of the latex might deter a squirrel from taking a bite?


#19

Latex is a combo of rubber and plastic, so it seems and would not allow the fruit to breathe.
I wouldn’t spray my trees with house paint.