Fuyu VS. Giant Fuyu


#1

Adding more non-astringents this fall. What is the difference in these fuyu other than size?

Have a lot of deer and need large trees, but noticed that most of the non-astringents are small trees. What other non-astringents are not dwarf sizes?


#2

In Dallas, Giant Fuyu is larger…at least based on the 2-3 I get every year. Not as productive as Fuyu, Fuyu is loaded


#3

My wife brought some some huge non-astringent Fuyu she got from a friend. These were easily over twice the size of my normal Jiro and Fuyu. I just thought they were Giant Fuyu because of the fruit size and not the tree. I managed to get two trees going from the seed.


#4

Ive seen some very large Suruga’s


#5

Just looked suruga up. Big tree and claims is the sweetest. Sounds good.
Someone else was saying that giant fuyu did not taste as good as regular fuyu. Might try your suggestion.


#6

I have a Giant Fuyu that is 7 years old. It is a big tree, and getting bigger and bigger (too big!). It alternate bears: year before last there were 1 or 2 fruits. Last year like 100 or more. So many that a main branch broke. This is despite a lot of thinning.

My Jiro is only 3 years old but is already bearing a lot. All of my 6 persimmon trees/varieties grow quickly.

If you get a Giant Fuyu, give it space and I would make the initial pruning very low down. And thin the heck out of it…the fruit are big and heavy.


#7

What would you say your quickest grower has been. Deer are a problem and quick growth is good. Would you rate giant fuyu as good as the others?


#8

I would say ‘Maru’ has been most vigorous. It has small fruit and is astringent. But Giant Fuyu is no slouch either - it grows very quickly also. My Fuyu (Jiro) is actually rather slow in growth.

When say good, do you mean speed of growth, or taste? If taste, well it’s my favorite. Not as firm and crunchy as Fuyu (Jiro). It has a firm spongy texture, which really appeals to some people. Some people I know rate it lower because of this, and prefer Fuyu. I actually disliked persimmons until I tried Giant Fuyu…now I like all of them.


#9

When it comes to eating them I am leaning towards the astringents. I have similar results. Jiro has been slow for me and regular fuyu is fast. Do you know if giant fuyu and hana fuyu are the same thing?


#10

i think depends on the nursery they seem to use the name hana fuyu and giant fuyu as one and others have them both at their nursery so they are not the same. confusing


#11

I have several astringent varieties outpacing my other trees in growth. These trees send up a lot of vertical growth. My most vigorous non-astringent is Tam Kam.


#12

Yeah, that was my experience. Some say they are the same while others have both. Someone has to be wrong.


#13

Does tam kam get tall enough to prevent deer theft?
Astringent does appear to have stronger growth in my opinion too. I have some Hachiya’s that are going crazy with growth.


#14

I’ve never had deer around so I’m not sure how tall trees have to be. Tam Kam has grown 3-4 feet vertically the last 3 years. It’s about 10 feet tall and 8 feet wide right now. A late frost burned back some limbs this year, otherwise it would likely be over 12 feet tall.

Picudo and Tipo are particularly strong, upright growing trees in my yard. They can shoot up over 6 feet in a year.


#15

I agree it is confusing. I have a Hana Gosho and I’ve also heard it referred to as the Giant Fuyu. Not sure if they are the same.


#16

@Monardella, when you say make the initial printing low down, do you mean leaving branches low to the ground? I have a Hana Gosho, maybe the same as Giant Fuyu depending on sources, and I’m wondering how to shape it after 4 years in the ground.
How big is your tree? Height is not a problem for me, but I was hoping to squeeze in a plum 12’ away in my front yard. I’m curious if they will crowd each other out based on your recommendations.


#17

Yes I mean developing scaffolds low down. That will buy you time. For my Giant Fuyu, I didn’t prune initially. I gave it a big space, and just let it grow to form a nice shape, which it did. I then pruned it to keep the height down. But it put on so much top growth that I gave up. It is now perhaps 15 feet tall, and the lowest branches are quite high up. So now it’s more or less an ornamental (because I don’t want to harvest with a ladder).

I think that containing the width of the tree might be easier than containing the height. But you need to be careful not to remove too much wood that will flower the following spring. I think you could squeeze in a plum since they have a narrow grown form.


#18

@Monardella, thanks! That makes a lot of sense. I think the shape and branches are unique compared to other trees, which is why I was a little stumped on how to prune it.
Does it have a mix of male and female flowers? I purchased mine from Edible Landscaping and this was in their description, so I was curious.


#19

I am not sure about how many males you will have on Giant Fuyu, but it will make fruits asexually just fine. For my tree, it is surrounded by many other persimmon trees, some that make lots of males, and so my fruit almost always have seed in them. If there are no other tree around, I would expect very few seeds.

Pruning persimmons is a complex thing. You’ve got brittle wood and heavy fruit, a tendency to make arching branches that may break in painful ways, and they are vigorous so are hard to keep small. They fruit on current year’s growth, and the flower buds are usually on the ends of those branches, so the fruit are often at the tips of the new stems, again making for a loading issue. I try to thin off all of the fruit from the tips of the branches as early as possible. With Giant Fuyu, the fruit are huge and heavy so this becomes an issue. I think I have lost limbs every year - sometimes smaller, sometimes major. For keeping it small, you need to do some hard pruning occasionally. When dormant pruning, you are trying to leave short, one-year twigs in place that are easy to reach…those will be making fruit. I find these and then head those back to reduce arching and heavy loading.