Lapin Cherry — is my tree ok?


#1

Is this something I should worry about? Some of the bark on this young lapin cherry looks a little rotten, and I can see some sap. Tree has appeared healthy with lots of growth, and a few cherries this year.


#2

Looks like a canker down the whole left side. Bummer.
Out of curiosity is that the south side? Just wondering if the canker is secondary to winter sun scald.


#3

West side, though it gets some decent late afternoon shade year round. What action would you take? Copper fungicide? Try to cut it out? Do nothing and hope the tree heals itself?


#4

I’m not sure. I haven’t had good luck with cankers. Hopefully someone else will chime in with some proven ways to fight them. I would probably try cut it out and wash-out the area with diluted bleach water or vinegar water, or something…not saying it’s the right thing, just what I would try.
The next problem is that it looks like you may have a bad fork just above that, meaning a place on the tree where it will split in two vertically once the weight is right. If that is the case…sometimes the best thing may be to just trim it below the canker and let it regrow a new single trunk. Seems drastic though, so maybe wait to see what others say, and take another pic a bit higher up. My Lapins I used to have did the same thing with the bad fork and I split it while just testing the fork and putting a bit of weight on it, less weight than even a moderate crop load would have given.


#5

@cis4elk The branch on the left is cut off just above the photo. It died with the buds just starting this spring, (probably because of this same canker problem, I now realize). My other Lapin looks like it has a canker, too. When I got these trees they were staked very tightly, and these bad looking spots were between the stake and the trunk. I assumed they were wounds from the stake


#6

Tree #1


#7

Tree #2


#8

Are these a lost cause?


#9

Could be … you may be able to let them hang on this year, then cut back to ground level, let the rootstock grow from scratch and then graft to it the following year. Since the root system is probably big and good you can get back to a big tree faster that way.

It has been a bad year for canker for me, my Sandra Rose was culled a few weeks ago since it got canker at the base, and my heirloom cherries all have canker and are going to get culled. I am going to do with them what I mentioned above, let them hang on this year and then cut to the ground in spring and hope they sprout back from the roots.

Getting canker-resistant varieties is very important in many parts of the country… Black/White Gold and Regina have been awesome for me, and every other variety I have tried has had problems.


#10

Hate looking at these pictures. But then I have a 30 foot tall Cherry tree all hollowed out by cankers. It suckers badly and I’ve tried grafting on them. Don’t know if my grafts will grow through the field of suckers.