Mature viewers only -- explicit Jujube videos/photos


#562

Looking good @Ruben !


#563

That’s a great idea! Thanks


#564

That should be completely fine for jujube. The two situations where I’ve had trouble with die-back are:

1- when I fall planted an active growing potted tree (from Florida) and the temperatures went below freezing very quickly and the low for that winter it was close to -10 F (not sure which part did it). Both trees came back from the roots the next year.

2- new grafts that didn’t put on much growth in the first year sometimes die


#565

Thank you Raf


#566

Thanks Bob!

That’s good to know that they would be ok staying outside and also good to know that they can comeback from the roots if dieback happens! Just like fig trees.


#567

Just remember if they come back from the roots only the rootstock will be growing…not the grafted cultivar.


#568

That is normally true, but I was lucky enough that mine were on their own roots from Just Fruits and Exotics. Even so, it set them back a lot and they are just starting to grow better this year (still under 4’ tall) and I planted them in October 2015.


#569

Great! I didn’t think about that. Well in that case I might have to protect them in a sheltered area like you suggest or at least protect the trunk and the pots as well.

Thanks Katy.


#570

sole fruit of vegas kinky(contorted seedling), prematurely ripened by 113F weather. Despite the oppressive weather, juvenility of specimen, and being confined in a plastic pot, this one tiny fruit is more juicy and sweeter than ANY fruit of burntridge’s contorted, even those that were harvested in mild conditions


#571

towering li, top photo, and gi-1183 below

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#572

How does GI 1183 do for you? Mine was massively productive, but the fruit was late and very difficult to mature properly.


#573

i wish it had opted to mature later this year, as it was fairly early to ripen considering we had a long winter(up to march)

it was forcibly ripened due to the relentless >110F days we’ve been having. The fruits look nice, but dry and foamy. It has never fruited as densely(as shown on that pic) prior to this year, and have had it since 2013, if not mistaken. Gi-1183 is actually a great variety if ripened in milder weather. Not too productive though compared to other more readily available cultivars


#574

We had A STORM last night. The kind that knocks fruit from your trees. So I had this ONE Coco fruit that wasn’t ripe yet. I found it not far from the tree and I guess the sun today turned it creamy. It really surprised me. Very sweet and a lot moister than Li…not exactly juicy and NO coconut taste. Lots of fruit hit the ground that was not near ripe. :cry:


#575

glad to hear coco seems to be better quality where you’re at. It has always been a relative dud here even in autumn … makes me think it likes a little more humidity


#576

I had a couple of years with 1183 where some of the fruit ripened properly and it was pretty good. I think those may have been cooler years. Roger liked it, so it may be best suited for San Diego type weather with a long relatively mild summer.


#577

one more v. lucky photo. Even more promising to me now, as the quality of subsequent fruits was not compromised despite more than a week of daily >110F temps. And considering that it is potted.

also continues to have that signature complex flavor of sihong when fully tanned. That fruity aroma in the mouth :slightly_smiling_face:
Fruits are not as dense as its mom’s, but have to say v. lucky is juicier and just as sweet. Can’t wait for next year’s assessment!


#578

How many inches of water/precip per season do you think jujube like? We’ve been going through a mini-Vegas (or Texas) spell this month (or summer) with the heat, winds, and very low humidity and I’ve been watering jujube some, but I’m not a good judge of it. Seems that the top leaves on my honey jar always seem to have some curl to them.


#579

My take on it is that jujubes like water. They are very drought tolerant and can produce fruit on a water starvation diet but unlike succulents they are not harmed by a good amount of water. Because I’m in Texas I do have to water mine especially the potted plants. Once I thought to try not to water them much but I have found that they do well with a good soaking. Once I accidentally left my hose running all night on my Chico tree and it looked fantastic the next day.


#580

Thanks. I’m trying to recall what rain is. I’ve heard of it. :slight_smile: I might give the jujube a good soaking then! I think this spot might have a fair amount of clay in it, but it soaks away eventually…especially if it finds the cracks.


#581

despite what i have written previously, i actually agree with this. Not sure though if @k8tpayaso keeps her soil soaked most of the time, as that is what where i will have a different point of view. My take is that jujus will benefit from a good soaking, but only after giving it the chance to have a period of dry-ish soil around its roots. Drying in-between waterings will concentrate nutrients and is what i hypothesize to be what jujus need to absorb certain nutrients, being xerophytes.

hj has the tendency to produce taco-like leaves and sometimes even cork-screw shapes, even when well-watered