Pear problem



Hi
I have two pear trees. Every year the fruits turns yellow and no edible.
I have no idea what kind of pear is it and what to do
Can anyone advise?

4 Likes

Both pictures are pawpaw trees or fruit. I saved the first image to zoom in and those are pawpaw branches, buds, & fruit, al-together.

You eat them when they’re begin falling.

5 Likes

Where are you located?

1 Like

westchester NY

Wow. I also scan it to an app and it was telling me Paw Paw. But I’ve been told it’s a pear tree before.
Anyways. No matter when I picked them up or store them they were hard as a rock and not edible

These are their flowers. I don’t think it’s paw paw

6 Likes

That right there is the strangest-looking thing I’ve seen. It looks in the Rosacea family but looks like a Stewartia.

I am thinking some form of cydonia oblonga (Quince).

I’m pretty sure that’s what you have. Edible for sure. But some you have to go to great lengths to eat.

(Even flowering quince fruit are edible. I have 4 ounces of jelly to prove it…just
waiting for the right occasion I guess to open it.)

4 Likes

Wow! You are the best. You probably right! I’m reading about it and looking at pictures
All these years that I threw away the fruits.
I’m reading it is hard
So probably only good for cooking

2 Likes

Some you can eat if they get to ripen a few weeks after picking, or if you slice them real thin with a knife. But, baking in some manner, or cooking is probably how they are most consumed. I have very limited experience with them actually. But if I spot one I usually know it’s not a pear or apple.

2 Likes

Thank you so much! Finally after so many years you helped me find out what is it. I appreciate it

2 Likes

Yes that is a quince. It is a pretty odd one being so long and thin and not fuzzy.

I would wait until they are very yellow and see if they are more edible. My quince are just getting edible now. Still I don’t eat them raw I cook with them. They are a great addition to apple sauce.

4 Likes

I think it’s not cydonia oblonga aka (fruiting)Quince but rather
Psuedocydonia sinesis aka Chinese quince

4 Likes

Jesse beat me to the punch. It’s Pseudocydonia sinensis.
I’ve grown it here twice, and lost it to fireblight, both times, once it got old enough to bloom. Pretty spring blossoms, good red-orange fall leaf color, handsome exfoliating bark - some rival some of the crape myrtles and eucalyptus for beauty of bark.

image

Since mine never lived to make fruit, I have no experience (within the last 40 years) with it as an edible or culinary fruit, but presume that you could use it in a manner similar to Chaenomeles fruit… or even some of the Cydonia quinces.
As far as I know they’re all seed-grown; I’m unaware of any named ‘cultivars’ .

2 Likes

Thank you so much for that information

I think it’s Pseudocydonia. Because it looks exactly like the pictures you sent. I hope they are edible

Any idea how can I pick them The trees are too tall. Also. When is the right time to do so. They are still not yellow.

1 Like

@Liron

If the tree is 30 feet tall here is one way https://www.amazon.com/DocaPole-Fruit-Picker-Extension-Twist/dp/B07KBJB9C8/ref=mp_s_a_1_1_sspa?crid=2E4GODW24BHNW&keywords=extendable+fruit+picking+pole&qid=1665095267&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIzLjk2IiwicXNhIjoiMy4zNiIsInFzcCI6IjMuMjUifQ%3D%3D&sprefix=picking+pole+%2Caps%2C353&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1 . Im not sure what size you need but there are many sizes.

If some are dropping or if they come off in your hand easily if you tilt them up they should be ripe. Once you pick them they should finish ripening inside.

1 Like

Finish ripening inside means I after I picked them I should wait until they change color to yellow? Is that ok to cook them when they are still green?

1 Like

@Liron

Once fruit ripens it typically turns color and softens. It can take days or weeks to ripen.

1 Like