Prunus avium

I have a bunch of prunus avium rootstocks. I am wondering if anyone here has ever grown them out without grafting and tasted the fruit?, Is it decent? thank you

The fruit quality and size will be variable. Sweet cherries are all prunus avium. You could graft a known cherry on the rootstock. If you wait it out you can topwork them later if they don’t turn out the way you want. At this point they could be anything but you can be sure they are not as good as what you can graft on.

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Here is some background information on Prunus avium for anyone who cares. Included are native distribution, common names, synonyms, and references.

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=29844

I said they are not as good as what can be grafted on but bing was discovered growing in the 1800s so truly no one knows until they produce fruit http://www.google.com/url?q=http://extension.oregonstate.edu/wasco/sites/default/files/horticulture/Cultivars/documents/ISHS05Varietypapertablelink.pdf&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwihz-TokcHLAhVEzGMKHR7HAXkQFgghMAU&sig2=D_hQaAocBf16bNaGtz-nBA&usg=AFQjCNF2Q6PH75klRrfswzfH5_Ieuc4-HQ . I’m sure there was no better fruit until bing showed up in Oregon the 1800s.

The very nature of “cultivars”.

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