Seedling Apples for cider


#21

I can not see any chance that they are named variety . The tree is growing among many other random trees that range from the worse disease infected nasty tasting apples to run of the mill apples that are defiantly edible but nothing special. I do not have a lot of experience with a wide range of different apple varieties but these apples have some similarities to the red delicious .


#22

That’s interesting Chris. They’re a pretty good find for a seedling. Looks a bit small, but at the same time somewhat attractive and well shaped for a seedling. Did you find them near an old homestead, old orchard or just out in the middle of nowhere? If you had to guess, how old would you think these trees are? Just a random guess based on trunk diameter etc? What similarities do you see with RD?
I hope you keep up your hunting, finding and posting…I enjoy it.


#23

Jesse, does the juice press out with that much difference in coloration? Does juice darken with air exposure the same as a cut apple does? I’ve never juiced apples, but I’d like to try it someday. That darker batch on the left looks more appealing to me. Which one tasted better to you?


#24

That was how the different batches pressed out, they were both quite fresh when the photo was taken. The darker one was interesting without much acidity, the lighter more refreshing with that typical cider ‘zing’.


#25

A quisinart or a blender is all you need and then squeeze it out in a towel. Granny Smith apples squeeze out almost like the green apple itself then turns darker by the air. It’s not very good on its own, but mixes well with others. This thread makes me want to go out and get a real press, just have to talk the wife into it.


#26

My juice always has a lot of foam I skim off which is great on oatmeal etc.


#27

I did a batch with my juice extractor and it makes a lot of that foamy pulpy stuff on top. Easier to use quisinart and ring it out.


#28

Yes they are near what was once a small orchard . The tree has to be several decades old . They remind me of the RD in the texture and that they are sweet without any tart. Not a real complex tasting apple but they are still real good and well worth propagating ! The size was real variable from what I would say would be a full sized apple to a lot of medium sized. However the tree was over loaded with apples so I am sure it caused them to run smaller than if the fruit had been thinned .
We are at the end of most apples already around here(already had our first snow accumulations) so not many more to check out before winter sets in but there are many acres of trees I never got to for next year. And as the word gets out around here that I am looking more acres will open up.


#29

JesseS, Are those glasses made out of wine bottles?


#30

Our weather turned off warm again so I spent the last couple of very pleasant days in my woods working on clearing the trail. It has been extremely dry in Kansas again so we are fortunate to be able to access parts of the property that are normally inaccessible this time of year. I would love to put more seedling apples down there but am concerned with getting them out if we get a lot of rain. How are you guys harvesting your apples? 4 wheeler, golf cart , carry by hand, truck? I throw a cart on my lawn mower to bring in big pear harvests when it’s to wet or a path is to narrow to use a truck. Water seeps out of the ground in a few small springs on my property which makes me tempted to grow kiwi or pawpaw there but I bet I could raise a lot of apples or pears there as well.


#31

Pretty apples!


#32

Fruit exploring the next town over this past weekend, I found a very interesting looking apple. I dont think the tree is grafted, though it is next to an old farmhouse. They look like asian pear! I’d classify them as a bittersharp cider apple, they do have sweetness as well, uniquely flavored.


#33

No question that is an interesting apple Jesse !


#34

People who like seedling apples and hard cider or regular cider might enjoy this story about Johnny Appleseed. I have another seedling that should fruit next year http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/real-johnny-appleseed-brought-applesand-booze-american-frontier-180953263/ . This is a thread discussing a few of the seedlings I’ve raised so far New Apple Seedling Varieties


#35

Fedco Trees has a number of seedling cider apples for sale this year available as scionwood, most from Maine or upstate NY.


#36

Michael Poulin’s “Botany of Desire” contains some very well written pages about Mr. Chapman. A quarter of the book is devoted to the unusual genetic traits of apples that make them so amendable to our “desires”. I highly recommend the book to all dedicated growers. The man is a brilliant essayist.


#37

Thanks Alan I will definitely look at that book https://www.amazon.com/Botany-Desire-Plants-Eye-View-World/dp/1501245759.


#38

How’s everyone’s cider apples doing?


#39

I’ve got a Dabinette tree that (knock on wood) will throw a bushel this year (2018). I think I will ferment it out single batch and blend if needed. The bulk of my true cider apples (Yarlymill, KingBlack, Harrison, Baldwin, AshKernel, GoldenRusset) taking the year off or too young. But my GoldRush, Sundance,Honeycrisp, Kidds OR and crabs (and others) are loaded up. Should make for some interesting Cider.


#40

Im seeing lots of apple threads and i was curious if anyone is getting fruit from my seedlings yet? Many requested scion wood
The crabapple should be getting ripe. See this thread also New Apple Seedling Varieties