Sources for Rondom redcurrant? -- found it!


#61

Yeah it would, nevermind then.


#62

That is OK, they like water. Not wet feet, as long as it eventually drains.

Yeah too bad about the rust! I have other new ones now too. My new puppy though removed all my labels. I put three new ones in ground and made a chart, so I know what they are, but all my ones in containers have no labels now. Damn dog!

Yeah I would like to see how they do too! Mine do OK, but I’m warmer than you.


#63

lol about the dog! Buster has a thing for anything hanging or sticking out. has to chew it! chewed the loop off the back of my hiking boot last week. chewed up my headphones 2 weeks ago. good thing they were cheap. luckily we started nov. with 3 ft. of snow . a lot melted in dec. but there was enough to cover the pot. so far we haven’t seen too many nights -0f and when we did it didnt get more than -5 so they should be alright. the snow cover is going to determine if they make it or not. i may get some pieces of insulation to wrap the pots next winter.


#64

i plucked the lower leaves that were infected to about halfway up the plants then sprayed fungicide and it stopped its spread so they do have some resistance unlike my goldens which would have died from it if i didn’t cull them. my other currants and gooseberry was less than 20ft. downwind of the tibens and none got infected so i should be good to go with those.


#65

Well, I was definitely over thinking this. Cuttings came, and it was 2 6-inch sticks. Nice and healthy, just wasn’t sure what to expect, and I’d read somewhere that 10-12" was the usual size for Ribes cuttings. Since they’re so small, I decided to pot them up and put them at room temperature. I also put on a little rooting hormone as insurance. I should be able to hold those and keep them growing until spring.

That’s too bad about your labels @Drew51! My 2 year old daughter likes to “help”. Sometimes she’s actually helpful, but it requires a close eye on my part.


#66

I’m envious. It’s just too hot here in the summer for them to keep their leaves and fight off the mildew, and in the fall they’re really stressed while trying to re-foliage. Afternoon shade doesn’t really help.

I’ll try one more year with heavier anti-fungal sprays, but I think I’m going to give up on currants. Gooseberries do a bit better.


#67

i cut some consort cuttings for someone on here and a 1in. piece i trimmed off fell in a small hole left from a stake. by mid summer that thing grew over a ft. and by fall it was nearly 2ft! was going to cull it but decided to leave it to grow as a hedge with its mother plant.


#68

Troy try crandall clove currants. they are very heat tolerant. theres a guy on here that lives in z9a CA and has several crandalls that he claims reliably fruit there. don’t remember his name. thats crazy as crandall is listed as z2 cold hardy in the plains where it grows. thats one hell of a adaptable plant! they are also drought tolerant after they are established. i have 2 in the yard. another one thats heat tolerant are the golden currants. they are native to s. CA.


#69

I know what some are. Like Rovada, but the blacks. I won’t be able to trade many of them. I still get all the berries, that is fine! I bred this dog. His father ate two of my blueberry plants, so little “Chancey” is doing better that his dad Jesse did when he was young… He has not killed anything yet! :slight_smile:
And Chance will one day protect my fruit as his father does today. Jesse really helps, no squirrels or rabbits dare come into my yard. Well once in awhile. I have one or two incidents a year where a fruit or two are damaged. I can live with that. The nets are there and help, but robins will try to get in and will if possible.I can’t net everything sometimes too. I also trained him to chase the robins out. He knows their call even. He jumps up when he hears it. They usually squawk above on the wires before they fly into the yard, so it’s been working really well! I still net all I can as he can’t be there 24/7. Little Chancey is young and fast, he is going to be a force to be reckoned with one day!

The birds are terrible with the berries. The currants they go after only after the raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and honeyberries are gone. The dogs have helped although I still need nets. I won’t leave him in the yard when i’m not home either.


#70

While continuing to overthink this whole thing, I came across a research article that found 1" single node cuttings were the way to go for black currants (highest rooting %). If I were feeling bolder (or had more twigs), I’d be really tempted to try a flat of single bud cuttings. Maybe next year I’ll give it a go if these make it. I also wish I had a tissue culture set up (and knew how to use it!). I had to trim a few buds and just knowing that TC could make use of every last little bud made it a little hard to discard them.

Doing my best to mostly leave them alone unless I see problems…


#71

I can’t wait for next season. I had these red currant cordons I took down to replace with better cultivars. I planted them last spring, but they grew little. I’m going to take more cuttings this year as backup. I’m hoping the ones from last spring are alive and take off. I saw Lee Reich’s cordon of Rovada, so I’m using Rovada, and Primus. It was hard as my cordons were fully formed. Oh well another five years…Here is a photo of Lee’s cordon.


#72

I love that picture so much. Something to aspire to.


#73

Starting to see some green on the buds. So, they’re definitely still alive. Let’s hope they stay that way long enough to get some roots! I have them in partially closed zipper bags to keep humidity up, so I’m not too worried about them drying out.


#74

Looks like I’m in business! A gentle tug confirms roots on one, the other is probably not far behind. I know I didn’t have much to worry about, but it’s still good to have one confirmed take.


#75

Both of my Rondom currants are rooted now. I actually ended up excavating the second one, saw the end was a bit withered. I re-trimmed and applied rooting hormone, then stuck it back in soil and brought it to the office where temps sit at 70-73°. It rooted within 4 days!

Also, I found this article that compares size, yield, color, sugars, etc. for several black and red currants, including Rondom. I think @Drew51 might find this particularly interesting. Sounds like Rondom was in the middle of the pack for size, but produced the sweetest fruits.


#76

Yes good info! Looks like Rondom is a decent currant. I have grown a few and many produce small strings of berries all over the place. It’s difficult to harvest. Rovada has long stings and is super easy to harvest. I prefer it. Also it ripens evenly. many you have to peck and hunt for the ripe ones. Uneven ripening is a pain in currants. You do get some uneven ripening with Rovada, but not as much as others. And much easier to manage. One or two strings might not be ripe yet. Best let them hang a while after turning red for best flavor. The color deepens when fully ripe. hard to tell though.
The study on blacks was OK, but their are so many, and many I have were not in the study.


#77

my consorts are uneven ripening and yes its a pain so i let them hang on the bush until the begging of august . by them the 1st. ones ripe are stating to shrivel and the last ones are completely ripe. seeing I’m processing them anyway, it works good and they are as sweet as they are ever going to be. birds don’t touch my consorts but if you do that with reds your going to have to net them.


#78

So… I had two rooted cuttings, growing fine, and then not so much. I carefully did them up and found the roots had rotted. I probably watered them too much. One of them still had green cambium, so I re-prepped it and stuck it back in some media. 2 weeks in, I’m pretty confident it has roots. I just hope at least one of those buds is still alive and there’s enough stored energy left to grow. Of course, the twigs of some shrub from my yard that I cut to stake up some repotted houseplants rooted great in spite of (because of?) my neglect.


#79

I was reading in a book on propagation that Ribes like to callus at cooler temps. So I’m trying some in a cool area in my basement right now and starting to see a few roots developing. The few I tried earlier this winter indoors did the same thing yours did. They leafed out, burned themselves out, and rotted.


#80

That makes sense. I did leave it in the unheated mudroom for a week or so, so that may have helped it root. I sure hope this one pulls through, as I’m not sure where I’ll be able to source another one.