Wild strawberry as groundcover

As the floor of my orchard matures and evolves from a heavily clayed mixture the life (weeds ) it supports has also evolved.

It is amazing how the mini environment in this 150x50 fenced area has changed in only 6-7 years.

Really eye-opening how quickly the change comes. I noticed because I was focused on this small area. I wonder how many other things like this that we don’t notice going on right in front of us. I noticed the parade of different vegatation that has come and gone.( Especially happy about the crabgrass going.)

This year I noticed that the section that has not been covered in woodchips or weed cloth has been colonized by wild strawberry plants.

My question is whether these make a satisfactory ground cover and should be encoraged or is this a problematic gift from H_LL.

Mike

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Wild strawberry are great!

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Wild strawberry fruit is what I wish all strawberries tasted like. Too bad they’re such little devils

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When you guys talk about “wild strawberry” I assume you must mean something other than Indian Strawberries, which are what grow wild here, and have no taste at all.

This is the wild strawberry I’m referring to (I think anyway) Fragaria virginiana (Wild Strawberry): Minnesota Wildflowers

The native woodland strawberries (fragaria vesca) are also quite good.

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our wild strawberries are very good. we used to pick them when we were kids. i still stop and pick some whenever they are ripe. never saw them as a weed but i guess they could be. would think they would make a good ground cover but controlling spread would be a issue. I’m using arctic raspberries as a ground cover around my trees/ bushes. they colonize and push out weeds quickly. make a nice light green groundcover and are tasty little devils!

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Are you describing Alpine Strawberries as your “groundcover”? They’re not very tasty .But make a fair groundcover in shady places

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I also love warching the revolving ground cover in the orchard. We have a lot of wild strawberries and they just fit themselves in with their neighbors without taking over anything. Ours tend to be scattered not solid. I wouldn’t mind having more.

The runners are surprisingly strong. We had one last year that grew down from our roof in front of a window (sod roof). Ice would form over it and it would blow around in the wind, all winter. They are so delicate looking we expected it to snap off anytime but it never did. I think i pulled it off in the spring.

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if you have them in your orchard Sue you have good soil. :wink:

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Here wild strawberries are super delicious, they are just small and few and far between not quite as vigorous as regular strawberries.

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I hate crabgrass invading my garden terf, and while a decade ago got them to stop spraying weedkiller on my garden (I am sure they still do on grass) now I get weeds.

But…my solution was to buy garden and woodland and alpine strawberies as well as ornamental pink panda type and let it cover the earth. It is finally working!!

Also Iplanted stepable varieties of thyme, edible but groundcover. Some died some are alive.

So keep the strawberries! If anything add some herbs too

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I’m doing the same. i have seedling creeping thyme and alpine strawberries started in my grow room , all growing nicely and my arctic raspberries planted 2 yrs ago. have spread quickly already. whats not covered with a ground cover is covered in 3in. of mulch which doesn’t stop the raspberries from spreading as they spread under ground. also why I’m planting alpines instead of wild strawberries as they don’t send out runners, which wouldn’t be able to root in the deep mulch anyway.

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