Antonovka Apple Trees (not rootstocks)

I wonder if anyone has any experience with Antonovka apple trees, not the rootstocks, but the trees themselves. I have just planted 2, they seem to have thorns (similar to plum trees in the way the branches start out as thorns, some stay as thorns and others continue to grow into branches). Can this be true Antonovka apple ?..with thorns ?

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I believe @galinas is growing Antonovka.

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Hey Andrew, my family planted an bareroot Antonovka in fall 2019. It seems I have no photo of it but I remember no thorns…Maybe we can compare notes as our trees grow?

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I don’t have an Antonovka tree, but a guy I know does. His tree has no thorns

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Since they are seedling trees, you should expect variation.

I have some 2 to 5 year old rootstocks…and one in-ground tree. Most, but not all, are thorn-free at this point. I plan to grow at least one to adulthood…for the apples. And even if I’m not thrilled with the apples, I’ll have a good source for growing my own rootstocks from seed.

(I might also add, Fuji seems to produce a good standard seedling rootstock, but too early to brag just yet.)

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For what it’s worth, I’m growing this example of Antonovka from Trees of Antiquity, and it’s thorn-free here. The fruit is quite good, too.

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If it really comes true from seeds as T O A suggests…how come they have it on M111 root instead of selling seedlings? :slight_smile:

Partly I jest, for I know there will be some flowers cross pollinated even if cross pollination isn’t required to set fruit. Out of 100 seedlings I bought a number of years ago, I have selected the one that has reddish cast to new growth leaves.
So, I do know they don’t all come true. I’m guessing the red in the pigment is probably coming from B118 or B9 but will find out some day I hope. Anyways, the seedlings don’t all come back true.

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Good thing for me - I don’t have room for a standard-sized tree!

Hey, you can always graft a limb onto a B-9 or a M-7 or whatever…or add antonovka to a ‘frankentree’

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Indeed, and already done. I’d planted it in a fairly poor location, and it didn’t thrive there, so I eventually took it out. It’s doing very well as a graft on a mature GD, though.

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There are many varieties of antonovka, but only the classic antonovka is propagated by seeds, and the tree does not have thorns. Thorns are a sign of a wild tree.
If you are interested, I will write the varieties of Antonovka in Russia.

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Gold Antonovka

Just saw your post. We have 7 huuuuuuuuuuge Antonovska. They were planted in 1949. They will receive a severe pruning within the next month because they have become… lazy!
Marc

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They’re beautiful trees! I get why people plant dwarf trees, but you have to admit there’s nothing more majestic than a row of full size apple!

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Don’t mean to brag but we have 56 acres and packed to the ceiling with native trees and bushes. We are indeed very very well known within the local deer community… and I would not be surprised at all that deers from other regions come every autumn to ‘sample’ our apples. Besides our 37 civilized apple trees, we have also a total of 48 wild apple trees. In October they scent of hard cider is so strong around the house that people stop right in front of our house and imagine that a huge party took place on the lawn a few days before… Marc

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I am interested!

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I have seedlings…some still not big as pencils after 4 or 5 years. some have ‘thorns’ (like G30 rootstocks) and some do not have thorns. One even has reddish leaves…and I’m growing it to a tree.
(Can always top graft it later if I decide the experiment isn’t worthwhile.)

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2641027A-1EA8-4EF6-8AC5-8916C5E6573A

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Antonovka Desert (десертная)