Apple Rootstock comparison

I was curious about the rootstock
Bud 10. Can anyone help me with the description?

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I grafted 10 a couple years back, and about that many already this time.
Have 15 on hand.

I’ll say this much for sure, they certainly have a better root system than any other size reducing rootstock…but I don’t yet confirm if they may be self supporting.

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It’s still protected…so use discretion in ‘multiplying’ it.

But, so far, I like it. Certainly hardy and precocious.

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okay
thank you for letting me know.

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Bud 10, small tree, needs constantly to be watered or it dies early on, needs to be staked the whole time you have it. I took the ones I had out. My ground was not what the Bud 10’s needed.

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I do wish they’d include soil texture, soil analysis, and local climate info for the sites where these stocks have been studied. Here I have sand as deep as I can dig. If I knew the test site was somewhat poorly drained channery sandy clay with 28 inches to bedrock, I’d take the results with several grains of salt.

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All I can say Mike is that I’m giving them a try. The roots are certainly plentiful, but I’ll find out sooner or later if there are conditions they can live and be neglected!

Dwarfing rootstocks need to be consistently watered and often need more fertile soil. That is a big reason I have switched to standard and semi dwarfing over time. if small size is your concern and you live in a climate with more rain and more fertile soil than me go head if you want a smaller sized tree.

Was hoping to see a general size comparison chart for trees on Bud10

Can’t find any chart for its vigor
compared to M26 or M9.

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i dont have a choice on what to use here. its so cold they recommend full size rootstock only. st lawrence nursery only sells their trees on full size cold hardy rootstock for that reason.

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@Boizeau
Here you go . You will have to use both charts

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Very true and a great idea. That would give the grower and idea of what to expect or what soil they are comparing.

Sure. I completely understand. What works for one person/area may be completely different at another location. I did the same thing when I planted it and continue to try different rootstocks. I wanted to try them out. I have several different rootstocks in my orchard. I have been keeping track of growth, durability, and production each year I have them in the ground. Some work well some do not. This year I am removing several trees that have been performing poorly vs the other ones. I have given them since 2013/2014 to do their thing. I think this length of time for a semi-dwarf or dwarf tree is enough time to prove their worth. Either produce fruit or be replaced. If they are not producing fruit or enough fruit I might as well have a maple tree planted there.I hope you have good luck with that rootstock. Keep us informed as it goes along. Hopefully you may have better luck than I had with them. It is like real estate at times- location,location, location.

No … money talks. Cornell isn’t interested in a comparison
to Russian of Polish rootstocks.

You might find something in Europe…some study…but I doubt it.

A size comparison chart comparing Bud 10 to other rootstocks.

Another chart comparing the disease resistance and other characteristics of Bud 10 to other rootstocks.

A NC-140 trial in which Bud 10 trees are grown and compared to trees on Geneva rootstocks.

http://www.horticulturalnews.org/98-1/a6.pdf

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Interesting note…B10 produced the largest fruits for the variety Honeycrisp of all the rootstocks trialed. * Per the Nc140 trial chart.

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