Compatibility grafting?

I would love to find a book on Compatability grafting. Is there such a book available?
Example of what I want to know
Asian Pear compatibility = OHxF 97, OHxF 87, Pyrus betulifolia , Pyrus ussuriensis
European pear compatibility = Quince, OHxF333, OHxF40, OHxF97, OHxF87, Pyrus calleryana, Pyrus communis, Hawthorn, Pyrus betulifolia
Apple compatibility = Medlar, Malus Antanovka, Malus-EMLA 106, Malus-EMLA 111, Malus-EMLA 26, Malus-EMLA 7, Malus-EMLA 9, Malus-M9 Nakbt.337, Malus baccata?, Malus x ranetka?
Quince compatibility = Loquat, pear
Cherry compatibility = Prunus avium, Prunus mahaleb, Gisela 6, Gisela 12
Citrus compatibility = citrus family
Japanese Plum compatibility = Prunus Americana, prunus besseyi, Prunus cerasifera?
European plum compatibility = prunus domestica, Krymsk 1, Prunus cerasifera
American Persimmon x kaki compatibility = Diospyros virginiana , Diospyros kaki, Diospyros lotus
Quince compatibility = Cydonia Provence Quince, Cydonia Quince A
jujube compatibility = ?
Peach compatibility = Prunus persica, prunus besseyi, Prunus Americana, Flordaguard, Titan, Lovell, Halford, Nemaguard, Nemared, Guardian, Krymsk 1, Krymsk 86, Bailey
nectarine compatibility =
apricot compatibility = Prunus cerasifera
goumi compatability = Elaeagnus multiflora, Elaeagnus umbellate?
che compatibility = Maclura pomifera
Mulberry compatibility = white aka Morus alba ? , black aka Morus nigra ?, and red aka Morus rubra ?
etc…

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Not that I know of. Be nice if that same book had info on growth habits of varieties on individual root stocks, say average height of Honey Crisp on every compatible root stock. Varieties that arent compatible with specific root stocks, and on and on.

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TurkeyCreekTrees,
That is exactly what I’m after and keep coming up short. Scott mentioned Pyrus betulifolia is compatible with European pears but they might grow very large as an example. I think I may have a couple I did by accident already. Every time I ask someone about this topic they don’t know much about it. Starting to suspect not a lot is known about it. This is an interesting article on sweet cherry rootstock http://www.hrt.msu.edu/faculty/langg/Sweet_Cherry_Rootstocks.html. Had someone email me wanting some scions to graft apple to pear or the other way around the other day and I advised against it. I realize there are a few exceptions though I’m not really sure even winter banana apple is as graft friendly on pears as what’s reported. This thread from gardenweb is interesting but nothing implies apples would be a good graft for pears long term http://forums.gardenweb.com/discussions/1454251/anyone-ever-successfully-grafted-pear-scion-onto-an-apple-tree. Would be wonderful to have a book as a resource with the 4 apples that work on pears or 2 peaches that work on certain plum rootstock etc. Apparently plum, apricot, nectarine, almond and peach are compatible with Mariana 2624 plum rootstock shown here http://www.google.com/patents/USPP11403 and discussed here http://www.raintreenursery.com/plantcare/how-to-grow-raintree-plants/rootstocks-plum-apricot-almond-and-peach/. Dave Wilson listed the following rootstock information http://www.davewilson.com/product-information-general/rootstock/comparisons

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There is a large research project covering part of your questions: http://www.nc140.org

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At least I know I’m not the only one interested. Rootstocks are the key to all we do in fruit so they are as important as the scions we choose, dirt, spray etc.

North American Fruit Explorers is probably a good source of info about compatibility
I have very limited experience at grafting anything. I have read and heard that one should use close relatives for stock and scions. But ! Do not be afraid to go for the impossible.
I have successfully grafted trumpet vine(Campsis) onto catalpa. the graft grew and bloomed for a year before it (they) died Was it a virus or delayed incompatibility? Any ideas?
Both scion and stock had to be half hard ,(between juvenility and maturity)

jerry

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NAFEX offers its members excellent resources but to my knowledge does not have a book or guide they offer on this subject at this time. Advice might be available through members.

Clark, this may be one page towards the book you’re looking for:

http://www.fowlernurseries.com/Rootstocks.htm

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Clark
You stated the possibilities from NA FEX much better than I. I should have checked for the whole bit ,before I wrote. Thanks for the update
Mark ,I think you have found a page

jerry

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for top working a crfg chapter put out a table of what works on what in this publication.

fewer caps tonight, I nearly pruned off my thumb!! Gotta keep an eye on those pruner blades when deep in the vines.

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I’m curious about that also. Clark, I grafted the Winter Banana last year (to seedling apple RS) and will add the pear this year. So, at least in a few years, I’ll be able to give an early report on that success (or lack thereof).
I’m also surprised there isn’t more info available on this stuff. I’m 100% certain there are individuals who do, or have, had some information on this stuff, but it apparently never made it to the internet.
There isn’t even any clear and concise info out there regarding Asian plum to euro RS and vice versa…almost nothing that I was ever able to find.

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My experience with japanese plums on prunus besseyi , americana, canadian bounty plum have been largely my own research. They are compatible. The japanese plums will not work on cherry plums or goose plums as examples. I just tried every plum for rootstock i could find and figured it out after getting some advice from Bob Purvis on what he suspected might work with besseyi.

Yeah…everyone here says they are compatible, but I put umpteen varieties on last year and all save for a very few overgrew the host and simply popped off. I’m much less than convinced at this point. All were healthy and wildly vigorous growing scions…just popped off. I posted a few photos last year that I think were pretty demonstrative. The ONE single reference I found online (and posted here) stated Euro on Asian = OK, Asian on Euro = not ok. Every single person on this thread that commented agreed that this info was incorrect. They had successfully done this as proof. Yet my little experiment (2 different trees of the same type, from the same source) actually supported that information.
I have nothing to go on other than those factors.

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Jeff,
To make things more complicated all of my cherry plums came from sandusky nursery so the question is are there strains out there that are compatible with Japanese plums? In my cases they were total failures. American plums are excellent rootstock for every scion of Japanese plum I tried. My experiment was over a hundred grafts. I found 2 more this year blooming that I forgot about doing a couple of years ago in 2013 or 2014. When I was a kid I recall my mom saying she had a besseyi x plum hybrid because we ate the fruit and it was bitter. The fruit was huge and the bush came from henry fields or gurneys. It was a Japanese cross I think. That variety of bush I think is still being improved on in Canada

Scott this is an interesting read. My grafting has mainly been on pears and apples. Haven’t grafted much stone fruit. I’ve been under the misconception that most stone fruits are compatible. But that article has taught me a few things, one of which is that some peaches can be grafted to Apricot but peaches can’t be grafted to plum. I was not aware of that. Kinda assumed most stone fruit was compatible.

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To elaborate further on cherry plums and why some claim success and others failure in grafting is because like I said above it depends on what the hybrid is. See this definition Cherry plum - Wikipedia. This article confirms what my mother told me as a boy about the cherry plums she had http://uncommonfruit.cias.wisc.edu/cherry-plum/

I was recently wondering if a Winter Banana interstem on bud9 could be used to create dwarf, precocious pears. Maybe a project for next spring!

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The article section I’m referring to is http://uncommonfruit.cias.wisc.edu/cherry-plum/ . “The term “cherry plum” is the common name for Prunus cerasifera of European origin, but the name is also used more regionally to describe crosses between cherries and plums. The term “cherry plum” as used in this website refers to cherry and plum hybrid crosses. Cherry plums, observed at Carandale, first became available in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Most of the original cherry plums were produced by crossing sand cherry (Prunus besseyi) with Japanese plum (Prunus salicina). Later cultivars were also produced from open pollinated cherry plums and by crossing cherry plums. Most have excellent quality for canning, jams, jellies, pies and juices, and some have dessert quality. Many are low-growing shrubs that produce heavily, making them well-suited for mechanical harvesting. Cherry plum requires cross-pollination. They grow best in sandy soils but most any soil will suffice as long as it is well drained. They do not tolerate waterlogged soils.”

So, there is a problem with Euro Plum on American Plum?

… the term “cherry plum” is … also used more regionally to describe
crosses between cherries and plums.

Only when persons wish to display their ignorance. I keep having to correct people who say that the cherry plums are a cross between cherries and plums when in fact nothing could be further form the truth. Not immediately correcting people only encourages perpetuating misinformation avoiding the modest risk of not making a new friend. You should reject this use of cherry plum too.

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