Does your Sugar Cane Jujube look like this?

Cliff, based on the picture can you tell what variety it may be? I am very happy with it and have been enjoying it from that first season.

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I have Tiger’s tooth and GA866 grafts. They are very different.

Clockwise, Redlands4, GA866, Sherwood and Tigers Tooth.

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Where are you located? The ripening time of the variety may help ID it…

I agree they are not Sugarcane… mine look just like Tony’s.

Other than Tigertooth (which I doubt… my Tigertooth are more slender with a bit of a bend), I would add Winter Delight (Mango dong zao) and Autumn Beauty (Qi yue xian) to the list of possibilities.

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Thank you. I am in north Texas, north of Dallas. They ripen for me around the time Sherwood ripens(Early to mid September)

It is grafted onto Sherwood which is my original tree.

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The fruit looks like my XuThou fruit. Ripens about the same time. My tree came from England’s.

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I can’t see any GA-866 on your picture, I’m afraid. They are elongated with a typical “nose” at the tip. Will be posting pictures as soon as they ripen up.

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I found these at the store today, could somebody identify please?

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That looks like Ziziphus mauritiana.

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Thank you! How does this compare to other Jujubes that are often discussed here please?

Not a clue. I’d google and see if you can find a video review on it. Honey Jar and Sugarcane fulfill my Jujube needs. That type of jujube is tropical, so no interest for me.

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Crunchy, juicy and mildly sweet. Some are sweeter than others but not as sweet as Chinese jujubes. Thay also do not have that distinct aroma Chinese jujubes have,

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Thanks! That’s a perfect match of what I had tasted! Now I’m very tempted to try Chinese jujubes, the only aroma I remember of them is from the dried packaged ones :unamused: I’m sure the fresh ones smell better.

Actually, I personally think the dried ones are more aromatic as they are more condensed (not sure if it is the right word).

I like both Indian jujubes and Chinese jujbes. They are not the same. If people expect them to be similar, they may be disapponted. Chinese jujubes also have a denser texture. Indian jujubes are about crunchiness and juiciness.

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i believe these are Indian Green Thornless Jujube ( Ziziphus mauritiana ) @mamuang can you tell me more about how Indian vs Chinese jujube compare when eating fresh?

I think I understand now why I don’t find the dried aroma that pleasant. It must be reminding me of the only jujube that I tasted in Tunisia which were much smaller than the ones I see here, and no one cared for them. I wouldn’t even call them crab-jujubes.

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Sorry,
I missed your post. I talk about good ones for fresh eating:
Indian/Thai jujubes crunchy, juicy, mildy sweet.
Chinese jujubes - crunchy (not as much as Indian’s), not as juicy but a lot sweeter and aromatic.

The popular The Indian/Thai varieties ripen when their skin turns paler green. I avoid buying dark green skin ones. They are picked too early.

Chinese ones usually ripen when skin turns brown.

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thank you so much to explaining. i dont ever see the Indian jujubes sold locally in my area. But if i ever see it ill know to pick pale green for best taste. I do like more sweet but im still curious about Indian jujubes since they look tasty being green color.

Taiwan green jujube is bigger and tastier than Indiana jujube.
I plant three seedlings of Indian jujube and plant to graft Taiwan green jujube.

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The most popular variety from Thailand now is called Milk (literally translated Fresh Milk), a hybrid of the Taiwan (for taste) and the Indian( from India for production). The best of both world.

You can google, Thai jujube, Milk. Unfortunately, I don’t trust sellers on EBay if they have the real Milk.

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do you know where i can get Taiwan and green indian jujubes? i dont want to buy from ebay either

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