DWN 2020 Highlights published


#21

The fruit was mushy,even before being ripe and probably didn’t get to 15 brix.
I still have the tree and will see what happens next year.bb


#22

I couldn’t resist- I included both a Octoberfest peach and Flavor Punch pluerry with my jujube order from GrowOrganic.


#23

I wonder what varieties could pollinate Flavor Punch


#24

This is the information that Dave Wilson Nursery has:

  • Pollination

Another Pluerry™, Pluot® or Plum required as pollenizer.bb


#25

Since the seed parent is sweet treat pluerry, I would guess that Dapple Dandy could pollinate Flavor punch.

Flavor Punch pluerry parentage is:

Seed parent: sweet treat pluerry.

Pollen parent: (plum x cherry) x ( Autum Treat pluot).


#26

Autum Treat pluot is a cross between Flavor Grenade pluot x unknown pollen.


#27

They were the first trees to arrive in 2020. And it couldn’t be on a nicer day- 64F and sunny.


#28

I will place an order for my pluerry in February.


#29

Is that because Grow Organic sends soon after the order is placed and you don’t have a spot for it yet?

I ended up putting the Flavor Punch in a spot that I was planning to put a jujube later in the spring. I’ve got until March to figure out where to put that tree…

Here’s the Octoberfest peach and Flavor Punch pluerry. I think the FP is the one on the left. Both were about 5/8" caliper, with the peach a hair smaller.

The Honey Jar jujube were quite large, all (I got 4 HJ and 3 SC) around 3/4", with one approaching 7/8". The Sugar Cane jujube were smaller, all around 5/8".

I got 6 of the trees planted (the peach and pluerry at my house and 4 of the jujubes at 3 different rental properties). Between that and 2 hours of squash, I’m pretty tired tonight.

Two of the jujube (by spring, there should be 4 more in that row, with 9’ spacing):

Edit: and yes, I was the one who did that excellent paint job on the fence :slight_smile:


#30

I still don’t have a pot yet to plant it.


#31

The Oktoberfest peach is on Citation rootstock. Does that rootstock do well in your area?


#32

Not especially. It tends to get very dwarfed and won’t produce much unless it is a vigorous variety or you baby it (and even then, it is limited). I planted mine in a well established row with plenty of rich moist soil, so I think that will help. Also, the trees are 5 foot spacing, so I don’t want it to get all that big.


#33

I ordered the Oktoberfest and Carnival also from GrowOrganic. I had planned on planting the trees below the graft line so hopefully they would loose the Citation rootstock traits. Looking at your pictures the graft is high compared to the roots - I have my doubts the tree will live/thrive if I plant it that deep. I am at a loss as to what to do now. My trees should arrive on Monday (tomorrow).

EDIT - I looked at your pics again. The soil line is close to the graft so I assume that they were planted that deep. Adding another 4 inches or so to the planting depth shouldn’t hurt … Right?


#34

It probably will kill the tree. Root flares need to be on the surface. The roots will be susceptible to root rot and also be starved for oxygen. Much worse in areas where wet feet occur from time to time. The tree roots cannot breath. You don’t pile mulch let alone soil around the base of the tree. It’s much better if too many roots are exposed then all roots buried. The roots will try to grow back to the surface. If they succeed, the tree will be OK, but it could die before it can. In my experience trees planted deep tend to die young.

This is not a universal truth. Some plants do not mind at all. Like currants or fig trees. Both should be planted deep. But stone fruit and apple type trees respond poorly to being planted deep.


#35

Well my trees came today. No pics but the Carnival I planted in a raised container in a wet area of my yard with the graft above the soil line. Had an Encore Peach planted there previously that did not thrive, hopefully the Citation rootstock will handle the wet soil better.

The Oktoberfest I planted in in a dry area also in a raised container, burying the graft two inches below the ground. Hopefully the tree will live and thrive, I have my doubts that it will develop the characteristics of a seedling peach with just burying the rootstock two inches.

I wouldn’t have to worry about all of this if Dave Wilson would grow all variety of peaches on both Citation and Lovell rootstock, instead of a limited few on Lovell.