Haskap/honeyberry...video demonstrates the productiveness of this fruit bush

Lots of folks trying out this fruit…few seem to know much about it.
Here’s a lovely video to help.

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In his situation seems they are thriving in low light/shade? I know hes up north… but do these do well in shade?

They are going in on the north side of my house. We’ll see. In warmer marginal zones that is the general strategy from what I can tell.

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my neighbor has them in a spot that only gets 3-4hrs of direct sun daily and they fruit about the same as mine in mostly full sun. they are definitely shade tolerant like currants and gooseberries. they evolved as a under story bush. i find mine are sweeter than his so its still best to give as much sun as possible at least up north.

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I planted some in a front yard of a home in the Bluegrass number years ago…get sun from 10 a to 4 p in the summer. Bushes look sort of ragged by August. Mourning doves love the fruits, and other birds do too.

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everyone says birds eat them but not here. i dont know why. once in a while ill find a few blueberries pecked but not often and we have alot of birds here. none of my fruit get eaten. maybe i have stupid birds or there’s enough wild food they dont bother with mine. not complaining.

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Odds are something more attractive is getting the attention of the birds…either that or your dogs and cats are earning their keep.?

unless im out in the yard, the dogs are inside. no more cat. I.D.K. its weird. i do have neighbors to the south and east but field to the north and west. the whole acre is rimmed with 50-60 ft. spruces, and red pine. many birds nest in them. ive seen them amongst my food forest. robins galore. yet they dont touch anything. i can take out anything from my living room window but as long as they arent bothering anything its live and let live. except squirrels. they go in my chic coop and steal feed and thats 30yrds from my hazel bushes so they have to go.

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Grower cooperative in Scotland growing, trialing, breeding…and mechanical harvesting honeyberries.

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Interesting that Cinderella variety taste better than the Boreal, for him. I have been looking around about it and there isn’t really much information, just “best eaten fresh or in jams and baked goods”. It certainly looks like a good producer with good size.
Anyone here have reports on Cinderella fruit quality?

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Sorry I don’t…but Stark Brothers must have the patent on it.

I have Cinderella, fruit ripens very early, tart, smaller size. It pure Siberian. I like it since it comes in before any other woody fruit I grow

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Have you watched the video at the top? Do you think you have the same variety? Big berries that are sweet(er)? It seems that there are two descriptions out there.

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Likely mis-IDed in the video either by him or his nursery source. Cinderella is an older variety derived of Siberian genetics that is pretty well known as far as it’s characteristics

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I have blue pogota and blue sea from OGW. Later blooming varieties…

In a 6-7 hour sun location here in TN.

3 years no fruit… blooms some but no fruit.
They have grown but only a small amount.

This will be year 4… hopeful.

Will try them in early morning sun location evening shade… next tine.

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Maybe fertilize them? Should fruit…but need to be 15 or 18 inches probably.

Stark shouldn’t have a patent on any of the haskaps or honeyberries as far as I know. They all are patented by UofS, Berries Unlimited or Dr. Maxine. Cinderella is terrible quality compared to any newer genetics. It’s part of the old breeding paradigms and anyone suggesting otherwise needs to try more honeyberries.

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Next year will be my first year growing them.

It looks like some people plant them really close together for pollination… where they touch each other etc.

What is your spacing? And curious if it makes a difference?

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I space mine 4-5’ apart, they will grow together after a few years. I’m sure they could be a bit further, bumble bees pollinate them here

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likely your warm weather is slowing them down. all mine had some fruit the 2nd year and decent harvest in 3td. year. full production in yr 4. they grow quickly here and i only use compost on them in the 2nd year but keep mulched w/ 3in. of woodchips every spring.

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